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Office Relationships

These are the careers where you are most likely to cheat on your significant other

Despite the risk of the fallout, many of us continue to engage in the adventure of an office romance.

Romances between colleagues are increasingly common — 40% of us have engaged in an office romance at one point in our careers. And according to a new SimplyHired survey of 939 people, some of us are not only willing to risk our careers, but our current relationships for cupid’s arrow, engaging in office flings even if it means that one of us is cheating on our current partner to do it.

Survey: Education and finance are the biggest cheating industries

SimplyHired found that there are certain industries that have more infidelity among employees than others.

The field of education had the highest number of cheaters with 33% of respondents acknowledging that they had been in a workplace relationship that involved at least one cheating party. The finance and insurance industry came in second place at 30%.

A survey from dating site Illicit Encounters also listed teachers as the profession most likely to have an affair with a colleague. Christian Grant, a spokesman for the site, commented on the results: “Teaching is one of the most stressful and time-consuming jobs out there, so teachers are far too consumed by work throughout most of the year to notice the cracks appearing in their marriage.”

High-stress generally is known to be harmful to marriages, which could explain the presence of relatively high-stress jobs such as teaching, finance, and government at the top of the list.


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On the opposite spectrum, workers in the hospitality industry were the least likely to cheat on their partner with a coworker, with only 17% admitting that they had done it.

Should you risk it all for that water cooler romance? Maybe not. Many respondents said they felt regret about doing it. Women were more likely than men to say they regretted the experience with 45% of women expressing remorse compared to 30% of men.

Meanwhile, men were more likely than women to report that they would have a sexual relationship with a colleague for a raise or a promotion, at a rate of 10% versus 3% for women.

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