Study reveals these are the 3 things that make us happy

As far as life-fulfillment and well-being are concerned, married couples rated 9.9 points higher than widows and couples that were separated.

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For the first time in five years, married people are happier than wealthy people, according to a new study published by The Office For National Statistics and titled Personal and economic well-being: what matters most to our life satisfaction. In fact, the only thing that makes people happier than being married is having good health.The analysis looks at the socio-demographic and economic factors that influence the well being of individuals.

It should come as no surprise that as far as life-fulfillment and well-being are concerned, married couples rated 9.9 points higher than widows and couples that were separated, but in contrast with results from five years ago, courtship yielded a more significant boost to wellness than “someone’s employment.”


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The key findings

Marital status, self-reported health, and economic activity had the biggest impact on happiness.  It should come as no surprise that as far as life-fulfillment and well-being are concerned, married couples rated 9.9 points higher than widows and couples that were separated, but in contrast with results from five years ago, courtship yielded a more significant boost to wellness than “someone’s employment.”

Age is actually the personal characteristic that informed overall satisfaction the most of all the factors surveyed. The researchers found that fulfillment tends to decrease with age and then surges again around retirement years, the study reports. “That is, life satisfaction is higher on average for younger adults, dropping to its lowest point when people are in their 40s, rising again as people near retirement age, and falling again as we enter our 80s.”

Spending frequency comes close to rivaling age in this regard, but its impact on wellness is ultimately dependent on social status.  For example, “household spending” was found to have a larger positive association with wellness.  Spending on things like eating out and hotels was also found to me people more satisfied, it thus follows that households with higher disposable income were more likely to report being happy.


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CW Headley|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at cheadley@theladders.com.