Workers in this industry are the most against contact tracing in the workplace

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As offices begin to open back up around the country and contact tracing becomes a reality that will be in our lives as long as the coronavirus is a threat, companies are beginning to brainstorm how they can bring employees back to work without compromising their health.

JetBlue has already announced that it will not allow customers to board a plane without a mask on, while other companies will require employees to social distance, will increase office cleaning, or will provide PPE to their employees. Another measure some companies are considering using is contact tracing within the workplace.

If you are unfamiliar with the term, contact tracing is a public health tool that has been used before. The goal of contact tracing is to break the chain of transmission of infectious diseases. While this measure is effective for slowing the spread of coronavirus, not everyone is comfortable with the idea of their employer “tracing” them.

Fishbowl, a workplace social network that connects professionals through conversations, recently surveyed 17,297 professionals to find out how workers are currently feeling about contact tracing in the workplace.

75% of professionals are against contact tracing in the workplace

Fishbowl asked professionals the following question:

“Would you use a device or app that allows your company to trace your contact with other employees while at work?”

The survey, which ran from May 29 to 31, included employees at companies like IBM, JP Morgan, Facebook, McKinsey, Deloitte, Bank of America, Amazon, Edelman, Nike, Google, KPMG, and thousands of others. It had two simple options for answers: yes or no.

Of the 17,297 professionals that responded to the survey, 12,919, or 75%, said that they would not use a device or app that allowed their employer to trace their contact with other employees at work.

The results varied slightly between women and men, with 77% of women saying they would not allow this, compared to 73% of men.

Which industry is most opposed to their employer using contact tracing in the workplace?

The tech industry was most opposed to allowing their employer to trace their contact with other employees at work, with only 19.08% of tech professionals choosing the “yes” option. The finance industry was right behind the tech industry, with only 19.46% of finance professionals agreeing that they would be alright with their company tracing their contact in the workplace.

A complete breakdown of opinion on contact tracing in the workplace can be found below:

  • 19.08% of tech professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace
  • 19.46% of finance professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace
  • 21.08% of law professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace
  • 22.52% of advertising  professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace
  • 22.84% of teaching professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace
  • 25.38% of accounting professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace
  • 27.02% of consulting professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace
  • 32.84% of healthcare professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace
  • 40.5% of human resource professionals would agree to allow contact tracing in the workplace

Which states are most and least willing to use contact tracing in the workplace?

At 39.79%, Wisconsin had the highest percentage of employees saying they would allow their company to trace their contact with other employees while at work, among states with more than 100 responses.

After Wisconsin was Connecticut with 34.84% respondents saying yes, Kansas with 30.50%, Indiana with 30.26%, and New Jersey with 28.75%.

Florida had the lowest percentage of employees willing to allow contact tracing in the workplace with only 19.55% of Floridian respondents saying they would be okay with the practice. Following Florida were South Carolina with 20.25% of respondents saying yes, Louisiana with 20.49%, Oklahoma with 20.65%, and Alabama with 21.64%.

Jennifer Fabiano is an SEO reporter at Ladders.