23% of respondents said this one thing is a relationship deal-breaker

According to a recent study of self-proclaimed grammar snobs found that grammatical errors might be the very thing keeping your Tinder inbox so scarce.

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The impact that poor grammar has on how frequent offenders are perceived in the professional world has been well-documented, but does it carry the same kind of adverse influence on our personal relationships?

According to a recent study of self-proclaimed grammar snobs conducted by Landmark reported on Mashable, advertising a penchant for incorrect punctuation and grammatical errors might be the very thing keeping your Tinder inbox so scarce.


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Don’t want “any” scrubs

Eighty-eight percent of the women surveyed in Landmark’s report said that grammar is pretty important when seeking a partner – 75% of men seconded this. Fourteen percent of both male and female dating app users valued grammatical proficiency so much they professed that it made them less inclined to respond to suitors that sent messages with too many orthography mistakes.


Being hyper-aware of any potential red flags when getting to know someone is understandable, but some of the respondents confessed to considering going so far as dumping a person that they were already dating if said person’s command of language was not up to snuff.

Twenty-three percent of respondents said that they would break up with their partner due to grammar, and 75% of couples confessed to having disputes with their spouse or partner over it.

Grammar appears to be less important outside the world of online dating. Forty-nine percent of grammar enthusiasts would not correct their mothers if her grocery list was littered with errors, 48% would not allow their snobbery to inform their decision to stay with or leave their partner, and 43% of participants above the age of 45 said that poor grammar didn’t mean anything to them at all.

This study was conducted on a pool of grammar aficionados living in India.


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CW Headley|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at cheadley@theladders.com.