This study will make you rethink your alarm clock ring choice

The study examined 50 participants and their morning routines, which focused on how each person felt the moment they woke up.

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Waking up to bands like The Beach Boys might start your day with “Good Vibrations” compared to the normal alarm clock, according to a new study.

Researchers at RMIT University in Australia found that waking up to melodic music like The Beach Boys or The Cure can fight morning drowsiness and prevent sleep inertia.


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Wake Up Little Susie

The study, published by BioRxiv, examined 50 participants and their morning routines, which focused on how each person felt the moment they woke up and how their days were affected after getting out of bed.

Researchers found those who listened to melodic sounds suffered less from sleep inertia and grogginess compared to those who wake up listening to the standard alarm sound.

“When they wake up, people experiencing sleep inertia may show signs of reduced alertness and reduced cognition, manifesting in inadvertent mistakes. Sleep inertia can last for seconds, minutes or hours after waking,” lead researcher Stuart McFarlane said, via the Daily Mail. “Research suggests that ‘difficulty in waking up’ is a common experience. It’s one that many of us share.”

Researchers feel boppier, upbeat music can also benefit the brain moving forward in the morning.

If you’re suffering from sleep inertia, it not only affects your mental skills but the early stages have also been equated to being as disoriented as being drunk. A study published by The Journal of the American Medical Association in 2006 said the effects of sleep inertia can be “worse than being legally drunk.”

The sluggish feeling can last anywhere from the first 10 minutes you wake up or can last for multiple hours.


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Kyle Schnitzer|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at kschnitzer@theladders.com.