To get salary transparency, Tiffany Haddish asks about the ‘guy fee’

When you learn the high numbers of what your peers can earn, you learn the right numbers to anchor your own salary negotiations around.

How much are you making at work?

This is a question too many women do not ask out loud. Men are more likely than women to share their salary, according to a new survey from compensation software company beqom. But comedian Tiffany Haddish is not one of these women. In a new interview for Variety she shared how she asks frank questions about money and hustles to get paid what she deserves.

How Tiffany Haddish finds out how much she should get paid

For pay equity, Haddish said she follows the ethos: “A close mouth don’t get fed.”

To make sure she does not lose out on money, Haddish said she cultivates relationships with employees working at different levels within organizations, particularly employees who are writing the checks. That way, when she asks salary questions, she can get honest answers on how much women and men earn for roles. “I ask around,” she said. “I’ve made friends with line producers that cut those checks, production managers, so I can be like, ‘So, on average, how much does a girl get paid for? How much does a guy get paid?’ OK, I’m gonna ask for the guy fee on this one.”

Haddish makes sure to not just ask about base salaries, but potential benefits within compensation packages.

“I think the reason why, a lot times, we don’t get paid the same as men do is because we don’t talk about it,” Haddish said. “I think we do need to talk about it because I sure get in there and I’m like, ‘Hey, Kate Hudson. How much do they pay you for that? What kind of perks do you get for that?’  I didn’t know they could fill your room up with whatever kind of food you want.”

In the interview, Haddish said that she learned her tireless work ethic from being homeless and hungry. From that experience, she said the motivation became, “I’m going to make sure this never happens again.”

When you learn the high numbers of what your peers can earn, you learn the right numbers to anchor your own salary negotiations around. When women are not transparent about sharing their salaries, they lose out on this valuable information. Asking is what gets you results. It’s a reminder how sharing salaries can help not just you, but the people around you. You cannot know how much you should be paid if you do not know how much the people around you are earning.

Monica Torres|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at mtorres@theladders.com.