This is when Millennials will get married across the US over the next 15 years

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Getting married is supposed to be a major milestone in American adulthood, but Millennials are not thinking about tying the knot any time soon. With hurdles such as financial security, Millennials are putting off marriage (and other life goals). The US Census Bureau said the median marriage age is about seven years higher for women (27.8) and six years for men (29.8) compared to marriage trends in the 1950s.

So when exactly will Millennials start getting married? Tuxedo rental company The Black Tux recently crunched the numbers using US Census to figure out the marriage trends for Millennials in 5 years (2024), 10 years (2029), and 15 years (2034) across the 50 largest cities in the United States.

In five years…

The study found that between 44% and 61% of the Millennial population is expected to be married by 2024, but it just depends on which state you’re from.

Those living in Idaho (59%), Wyoming (60%), Utah (61%), Alaska (57%), and Arkansas (58%) were found to be produced to have the highest percent of married millennials over the next five years.

Northeastern Millennials living In New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Massachusetts had some of the countries lowest marriage percentages, all rating below 48%. Rhode Island had the lowest percentage of all states with just 44% of Millennials expected to wed in five years.

In 10 years…

Parents waiting for their Millennial children to tie the knot might have a better shot by 2029.

Researchers found that there was about a 10% increase in the likelihood of Millennial marriages, from 52% to 74%, with just a little bit of waiting.

Utah had the greatest number of projected Millennial marriages in 10 years, as did neighboring states Colorado and Idaho. But in places like Washington DC and Rhode Island, almost half of the Millennial population will remain unmarried.

In 15 years…

In 15 years, 59% to 82% of Millenials across the US will be married, with nearly 80% of Millennials in Wyoming and Utah expected to live happily ever after.