The average American would delete their Facebook for this amount of money

More than 65% of respondents reported deleting Facebook because they didn’t want the site having their personal information.

A cocktail of bad public relations, has many Facebook users adjusting their relationship with the popular social media site. A new Pew Research Center study underscoring the harmful effects Facebook has on mental stability, particularly that of America’s youth was foreshadowed by a series of high-profile data and privacy breaches.

A survey published last year revealed that three and four Facebook users are mitigating their use of the site, with 42% deciding to take a break from using the site at all.  Security.org surveyed 1,000 facebook users in order to determine the primary factors that have damaged the social media’s site’s trust.


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Who steps away from Facebook the most?

Eighty-six percent of adults between the ages of 18 and 29  are “social media users.” Millennials accounted for the majority of the 7.8% of users that decided to take a break from Facebook completely. The reports point out the dissonance of this pretty early on. Social media and millennials have become synonymous in recent years, though Gen Z’ers actually make up most of the users.

A new study published by Schwab’s 2019 Modern Wealth survey reports that social media causes half of the Millenials to spend money that they don’t have, which maybe feeds into the 25% of users that said too many ads is why they would delete their Facebook accounts.

The most cited reasons for giving Facebook up revolved around security concerns. More than 65% of respondents reported deleting Facebook because they didn’t want the site having their personal information.  Sixty percent of respondents said they deleted the app, due to general concerns about their privacy.  The remaining factors mentioned mostly had to do with adverse social elements. Fifty-eight percent cited “too much unnecessary drama,” 43% cited “too many political arguments,” and 31% said they kept comparing their lives to others.

 

What is Facebook worth to you?

The average American said they wouldn’t permanently delete Facebook for anything less than $1,609, though this figure varied depending on gender and generation.  For men, the number settled around $1,983, while women reported a median amount of $2,074. Baby Boomers were both found to use Facebook less frequently and be less likely to give it up. Baby Boomers and Generation X both required more money to consider getting rid of their Facebook forever than Millenials

 

Is it worth it?

Two in three respondents said they’re hesitant to give up Facebook because it helps them stay in touch with friends and family. More specifically, Millenials reported relying on Facebook for news. Only 34% of users said they kept their Facebook simply for the service itself. This makes sense in consideration to all the criticism its interface has received recently.

Whatever you might say in defense of Facebook, the fact of the matter is 0% of users surveyed that deleted the app, reported any negative side effects after doing so. In fact, 41% said that they were slightly happier after leaving Facebook, and 46% said that they were significantly happier.  Forty-four percent of respondents said that deleting Facebook improved their relationship with their significant other.  Fifty-four percent said that they read more when they deleted the app and nearly 47% said that deleting Facebook made them exercise more.

 


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CW Headley|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at cheadley@theladders.com.