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Survey: The cities with the most employees who would jump ship for a higher salary

New research from staffing firm OfficeTeam shows that Des Moines is the city with the most workers who would leave their current positions for one with a higher salary, at 54%. Overall, 44% of employees said that they would do this.

Independent research firms surveyed more than 2,800 adult office employees in 28 large American cities. They also gathered data from “more than 300 HR managers at U.S. companies with 20 or more employees.” OfficeTeam came up with the surveys.

These cities have the most employees willing to leave their job for more money

  • Des Moines: 54%
  • Cleveland: 52%
  • Philadelphia: 51%
  • Salt Lake City: 51%
  • San Diego: 50%
  • Detroit: 50%

Brandi Britton, a district president for OfficeTeam, commented on the research in a statement.

“Employees want to be compensated fairly and feel challenged and fulfilled in their jobs … If higher pay is the primary reason for considering another position, professionals should first see if there is an opportunity to discuss a wage increase in their current role. Employers may be open to negotiation if it means keeping a good worker.”

Why employees would leave the jobs they have

These are the why respondents would be “most likely” to leave their current jobs behind:

  • “For more money:” 44%
  • “For a company with a higher purpose/stronger mission:” 12%
  • “Don’t feel appreciated:” 12%
  • “Bored/unchallenged by work:” 12%
  • “Bad commute/want something closer to home:” 7%
  • “Corporate culture is not a fit:” 7%
  • “Unhappy with boss:” 6%

Clearly, people feel compelled to leave their jobs over more than just money, but while 40% of men said they would exit for one offering greater pay, 47% of women said they would do the same.

HR managers also weighed in how the nature of someone’s job resignation impacts “future career opportunities,” with 56% saying it “somewhat affects it.” But while 27% said it “greatly affects it,” 16% said it “does not affect it at all.”

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