According to a study, Millennial dads are terrible at this

The poll interviewed 1,000 Millennial and 1,000 baby boomer dads, and it looked at the habits of them when it comes to around the housework.

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Millennial dads are unlike any other dads when it comes to everyday fixes, according to a new survey.

A new poll conducted by OnePoll found that Millennial dads are less capable compared to their own dads — Baby Boomers — when it comes to do-it-yourself fixes, finding that more than half of Millennials prefer to call a professional than fixing the problem themselves.


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The poll, which interviewed 1,000 Millennial and 1,000 baby boomer dads, wanted to explore the habits of the different dads when it comes to around the housework. Surprisingly, over a third of Millennial dads don’t even have the proper tools in their homes to carry out DIY jobs. Thirty-two percent claimed to not own a hammer while 38% wouldn’t be able to fix loose screws because they don’t own a screwdriver. In comparison, 93% of boomer dads said they owned a hammer.

“The technology in the average home has evolved,” said Anne Ferguson, VP of marketing at Alarm. “Hi-tech upgrades like smart home technology require professional support, especially safety and security upgrades. Even the handiest dads see the value of partnering with a professional service provider on an important project like a smart home security system.”

Millennial dads said they rather spend time with their children than partake in DIY activities. Sixty-one percent said they would rather hang out with their kids with nearly half saying they do a better job at spending quality time with their kids compared to their own dad.

If there’s one thing Millennial dads have the upper hand on their own dads, it’s being technologically savvy. Sixty-two percent of boomer dads said Millennial dads are better at tech-related jobs compared to themselves. Both grounds agreed that the expectations of being “handy” has changed with over three-quarters of both agreeing.

“Just as dads’ roles have evolved, so has the definition of handiness,” says Ferguson. “Today’s time-pressed dads are quick to master new tools like apps and mobile technology for their families’ benefit. They’re also more likely to outsource time-consuming home maintenance to professionals who have the tools and training to get the job done right — a handy trade-off that enables today’s dads to spend more time with the people they love.”


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Kyle Schnitzer|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at kschnitzer@theladders.com.