8 superpowers startup founders wish they had

Question: If you could have one business superpower, what would it be?

Question: If you could have one business superpower, what would it be?

To have superhuman execution speed

“I believe that fearless decision making and speed is the ultimate weapon in business. Making decisions and executing on them efficiently can give any business a competitive advantage. You don’t need thought. You need inertia. Think about ideas and take action. With superhuman execution speed, I’d want to be the one with the power to set the pace. ”

Ryan Stoner, Phenomenon@Stoneage

To have a resilient mind

“Building a company is a never-ending journey of highs and lows. One of the hardest things I’ve learned isn’t a skill, it’s a mindset. Having a resilient mind — the ability to spring back into shape after continually being stretched out and compressed — is an advantage to thriving in the intensity.”

Alexandra Skey, Ella, @alexandraskey

To stop time

“The ability to stop time would help me kill two birds with one stone. Not only would I be able to maximize my work day, but I would find time in the frozen hours to help solve the elusive work-life balance. Having the time to write birthday cards, catch up with an old friend, take that cooking class, or squeeze in a workout while still giving my 100 percent at ZinePak would be a dream come true!”

Kim Kaupe, ZinePak, @kimkaupe

To have an innate ability to sell

“There’s no way to avoid sales in a startup, whether it’s selling to customers, trying to raise capital, etc. I’ve had to work constantly on developing my sales skills, and it will always be something I’m looking to improve. I’ve met people who seemed to be born with the “sales gene.” It’s an immensely valuable asset to bring to your company, whether it’s a startup or not.”

Charles Bogoian, Kenai Sports, LLC

To have telepathy

“As a marketer, I’m always trying to get inside my customer’s head. If I could do this both during the sales process and while strategizing our messaging, I would be even more effective at positioning my offering’s capabilities relative to my customer’s actual needs. To me, that’s what marketing is really about: helping people find what they’re looking for to solve their problems.”

Andy Karuza, FenSens, @andykaruza

To track downtime wasters

“As a remote company, finding the members of your team who aren’t using their time efficiently is a difficult task, but often the one that can be most beneficial for you long term. The reality is, people have a difficult time remaining focused, and while some team members can make up for their inefficiencies by being rockstar employees, some individuals need to constantly be kept on track to remain cost-effective to your company.”

Blair Thomas, eMerchantBroker, @eMerchantBroker

To be the master of influence

“Getting to “yes” is part art and part skill. If I had one superpower, it would be the ability to influence others easily. Every interaction, every engagement, and everything we do in our lives revolves around the ability to influence others. I guess this is the skill that comes with being a “celebrity,” which can work for you or against you.”

Chris Brisson, Salesmsg, @chrisbrisson

To always hire the perfect person

“CEOs like to think that they produce the bulk of their company’s value. They don’t. They are but a small fraction of the total value generated by their enterprise. As such, hiring is the single most important skillset a leader can have. If you are able to get the best people on board — even if you are mediocre — your chances of success will soar.”

Joel Butterly, InGenius Prep, @JoelButterly

This article originally appeared on Business Collective.

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