This trendy new superfood you’ve never heard of could be a gamechanger for your hair and body

Last year, Ladders predicted that the Flexatarian Diet would be the next to recruit the Gen Z wave of health fanatics.

The diet is celebrated for its amendable pillars. Subscribers of the Flexitarian diet mostly consume plant-based foods while allowing meat and other animal products in moderation–and at their own discretion.

To support this regimen, it’s important to have a backlog of alternative condiments and meal enhancers.

According to a new paper published in the journal PlosOne, breadfruit provides a wealth of benefits for those seeking to limit processed food intake.

In addition to being rich in fiber, (10.8 grams per cup), amino acids, and antioxidants, breadfruit has been independently studied to boost heart health, curb excessive weight gain, facilitate hair growth, and prevent skin infection.

“Breadfruit is a traditional staple crop from Pacific islands with the potential to improve worldwide food security and mitigate diabetes. Flour produced from breadfruit is a gluten-free, low glycemic index, nutrient-dense, and complete protein option for modern foods but basic scientific knowledge of health impacts of a breadfruit-based diet in animals and humans was lacking. We designed a series of studies to provide basic and fundamental data on impacts of a breadfruit-based diet through an in vitro and in vivo model. Cooked breadfruit flour was digested through a multi-stage enzyme digestion model to estimate protein digestibility in comparison to wheat flour. Breadfruit protein was found to be easier to digest than wheat protein in the enzyme digestion model.”

The authors determined that the average American consumes roughly 6.67 ounces of grain each day.

Individuals who replaced this value with breadfruit sources said they could achieve 60% of their daily fiber intake and 33% of their recommended daily value of protein vitamin C, potassium, iron, calcium, and phosphorus.

Breadfruit flour: a healthy option for modern foods and food security

Breadfruit is a species of flowering tree in the mulberry and jackfruit family domesticated in New Guinea, the Maluku Islands, and the Philippines.

The researchers behind the new report are based out of The University of British Columbia.

The team set out to establish breadfruit as an optimal alternative to unhealthy protein sources and grain flour during the baking process.

To exercise this, a crop of mouse models were recruited.

Followup analysis yielded positive associations with proper digestion and the protein found in breadfruit.

The mice fed breadfruit exhibited a higher growth rate compared to the mice in the control group fed a wheat diet. The former also consumed more water than the latter.

“Overall, these studies support the use of breadfruit as part of a healthy, nutritionally balanced diet,” one of the study’s co-authors, Ying Liu, explained in a release. “Flour produced from breadfruit is a gluten-free, low glycemic index, nutrient-dense, and complete protein option for modern foods.”

Breadfruit actually evidences a comparable glycemic index to common sources like wheat, yams, and potatoes, with a myriad of other benefits to boot.

“Breadfruit is a traditional staple crop from the Pacific islands with the potential to improve worldwide food security and mitigate diabetes,” UBC researcher Susan Murch added in a recent university release. “While people have survived on it for thousands of years there was a lack of basic scientific knowledge of the health impacts of a breadfruit-based diet in both humans and animals.”

The new paper was authored by Ying Liu, N. Brown, Diane Ragone, Deanna L. Gibson, and Susan J. Murc.