This is the shocking number of people that have stress-cried at work

Maybe surprisingly, not only have nearly half of the respondents surveyed wept at work due to stress, but 36% of those who cried were men.

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Sometimes, the stress runneth over. If you’re lucky, your work-tears have flowed in the restroom, or at the end of a long, empty hallway. Ginger, an on-demand behavioral health system, released its first annual “Workforce Attitudes Towards Behavioral Health Report,” where they surveyed 1,214 workers with employer-provided benefits over a one-year period about emotional and mental health.


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Maybe surprisingly, not only have nearly half of the respondents surveyed wept at work due to stress, but 36% of those who cried were men.

Crying game

  • 83% of respondents experience stress at least once a week, with 16% reporting “extreme stress,” meaning experiencing stress daily. Manual workers, Gen Z, and lower-income employees reported the highest levels of extreme stress.
  • 81 percent of workers said that stress negatively affects their work negatively, and results in symptoms ranging from fatigue and anxiety to physical ailments.
  • 50% of workers missed at least one day of work per year due to their mental or emotional health. Gen Z and Millennials are the groups more likely to miss more than one day.

Employees are beginning to consider their mental health more important than ever, however: 85% ranked mental health services as “important” when considering a new job.

Mental health resources

Access remains a problem: one-third have paid out-of-pocket for mental-health services their employer benefits didn’t cover.

And 81% never used their mental-health benefits at all. Various reasons given were concerns over their employer finding out, not enough time, or difficulty finding providers.

Only 26% of the workplace actually seeks professional help for their workplace stress. Of that quarter, the younger generations were the most likely to get help, with Millennials at 62%, followed by Gen Z at 54%.


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Sheila McClear|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at smcclear@theladders.com.