Articles about Science of Work

the whole human

The single most proven thing you can do right now to get smarter and happier

Being in good shape increases your ability to learn.

Productivity

4 secrets to reading body language like an expert

In five minutes you can often evaluate people with 70% accuracy.

science of work

8 ways body language beats IQ

It’s a powerful tool in negotiation.

Technology

From supermodel to super role model: Karlie Kloss’s effort to get more women in tech

We are constantly told there are not enough women pursuing careers in the STEM fields. Part of the problem is the pipeline issue. This is something model and entrepreneur Karlie Kloss has been tackling since 2014 when she launched her foundation Kode With Klossy to help teach young girls to code.

Productivity

Are you seeing your coworkers through ‘coffee goggles’?

Many people say 'Don't talk to me until I've had my first cup of coffee' in an attempt to indicate that they are not fit for social interactions with other humans until they have some caffeine in their blood stream. It is a bit of an exaggerated statement but according to a new study, it has some real truth to it. 

Artificial Intelligence

Middle management job security in the age of automation

What issues are raised when a bot can do a white collar business person’s work as well or better than the person who pays the dry cleaning bills?

Salary

Study finds that ‘very unattractive’ people make more money

A study from the Journal of Business and Psychology of 20,000 young Americans, interviewed the subjects at home at age 16 and then three more times before they turned 29-years-old. The researchers looked at the correlation between attractiveness and income of the participants based on a five-point scale of physical attractiveness from "very unattractive" to "very attractive." They found something very interesting when it came to looks and earnings...

News

These are the 25 Fortune 500 companies that offer the most remote-friendly jobs

Working remotely is becoming the norm. There has been a 115% percent increase in telecommuting between 2005-2015 and the percentage of workers doing all or at least some of their work remotely has increased from 19% in 2003 to 24% in 2015, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

wellness

Stanford professor: The workplace is literally killing us

No good employer is going to outright say that they kill you, but new research finds that too many modern workplaces are grim reapers inflicting a fatal amount of stress on our bodies and minds.

News

This is how our names can determine our careers

When your last name is Carpenter and you grow up to work as a carpenter, you may think of it as a funny coincidence, but research finds that your name could have been nudging your subconscious all along.

News

New headset would allow ‘silent speech’ between humans and tech

There's new technology that wants to make conversations with your devices and other humans completely silent and seamless. People will be able to talk without opening their mouth.

News

Study: Women in heavier makeup are less likely to be seen as leaders

For women to be taken seriously by their colleagues at work, they may have to hold back on the mascara.

News

Study: 77% of adults are on the Internet every day! Here’s how to keep it from controlling your life

We spend a lot of time on the Internet, but it's possible to escape its grasp.

News

Study: A top promotion can double a woman’s chance of divorce

A woman's professional success may come at the cost of her marriage. When women got promoted to the top job in their field, it doubled their chances of a divorce. The same was not true for men being promoted.

News

Study reveals the work issues people lose the most sleep over

People stay up worrying for a variety of reasons, but for some, it's because of work. Nearly half of workers can't get a good night's rest because of their jobs.

Creativity

It’s in the tea leaves: Study says one cup a day boosts creativity

Next time you're looking for inspiration for your next brainstorming session, take a break to brew yourself a cup of tea. Just one cup of black tea has the power to boost creativity long after you drink it.

News

This study finds that Queen Bee Syndrome is very much alive at work and this is the guilty party

If you thought Queen Bee Syndrome lived and died when you were in high school, you are wrong. It is very much still alive and probably occurring in your workplace right now.

Productivity

This is why you’ll try harder at age 29, 39, 49, 59 …

If you are feeling a sudden burst of motivation to tackle a big goal, your age may be the cause.

News

Study reveals the reason people quit while they are ahead

Now that the Olympics have ended, many gold medalists from the 2018 Winter Games may be taking a long, sometimes permanent, break from the sports they spent years working to be the best at.

News

Study: Your office’s dim lighting could be making you a dimwit

If you are having trouble remembering what you did today at work, your office light may be the culprit. A new study published in Hippocampus found that dim lighting makes it harder to learn and remember tasks.

News

Study: Workplace wellness programs do not save employees money or make them healthier

Over 50 million workers are currently enrolled in workplace wellness programs, but a new study from the National Bureau of Economic Research found that these programs did not significantly save employees money or make them healthier.

Sleep

Study: Yes, you may be able to catch up on sleep during the weekend

Stop feeling guilty for hitting snooze on Sunday morning. The extra sleep will help you recover from the week before, and help you prepare for the long week ahead.

News

Study: Need for peer approval is the biggest motivator at work

Wanting a gold star of approval is not a desire we outgrow after grade school, new research on motivational messages found. An email telling you that "you are not a top performer" could be the most effective message to change your behavior.

Salary

Study: This is how much non-compete clauses hurts employees

Noncompete clauses, or agreements to delay working for a competing company, can follow us long after we've left a job, limiting our options to find work in our cities and reducing our salaries for years.

Science of Work

Study: These kind of job descriptions are more likely to turn away women candidates

How you frame a role's requirements can alienate and deter qualified candidates from applying. Is your job description turning away female candidates before they even apply?