Articles about According to Science

News

Just sniffing coffee is enough to boost your job performance

A new study explains why the pick-me-up of coffee's scent is not just in our heads. Coffee's scent has brain-boosting powers.

Office Life

Study: Meetings with agendas are less wanted, but they work

Meetings can be time-sucking vortexes that steal our attention and energy. But here's some bad news for those of us who hate meetings — meetings work.

News

Study: An orange a day keeps the bad vision at bay

There is one fruit proven to boost your sight and prevent loss of vision — an orange. Start chopping up those orange slices.

Health

Why your cold can feel worse in the summer

The reason why your summer cold can tend to feel worse than a winter cold is more psychological than biological, experts say.

Productivity

6 ways to use music to increase your productivity

Whether you’re using it to pump you up to work out when you’re tired or to unwind for a better night’s sleep, music is a powerful motivator in many different situations. According to the team at Brain.fm, functional music — which has specific characteristics — can also be ultra-helpful when you want to stay focused at work.

Family Life

6 things the happiest families all have in common

Family life is hectic. Most of play it by ear and hope it works out well. Are there legit answers about what creates the happiest families? Yes, there are.

News

Does thinking you look fat affect how much money you earn?

Does our own perception of our bodies, even when incorrect, make a difference? In other words, does thinking about weight affect your wages?

News

Study: Couples in gender-equal countries get better sleep

A study has found gender-role dynamics can change how well you sleep at night as societal expectations of role obligations change your quality of sleep.

News

Sorry, but coffee will not sober you up, according to a new study

According to a new study, coffee does not sober you up if you are drunk — it's not the miracle elixir we thought it was.

Office Life

Study: Open office plans cause us to ‘socially withdraw’

Research shows that open office plans can result in workers to "socially withdraw" – retreating to their desks and the privacy of the internet.

Health

Swimmers beware! July is the most dangerous month to go lake swimming

You may want to think twice before going for a dip in the water this summer. Your favorite lake or river can be a cesspool of diseases.

According to Science

Good news! You do in fact learn from your mistakes, study finds

Turns out, the old adage is true — you do learn from your mistakes, but it helps if you were close to getting the right answer all along.

wellness

According to science, this internet video phenom may have surprising health benefits

The Internet phenomenon, ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response), is not only relaxing but could also have incredible effects on your well-being.

Productivity

This weird research-backed, goals-setting hack actually works

Over the past four years, I’ve discovered many incredible ways to hack my habits, set better goals, and improve my life.

Productivity

The neuroscience of change: How to train your brain to create better habits

Habits are the brain’s internal drivers. If you want to change how you work or a bad habit, you should have a clear exit strategy to break out of the chain.

News

This is why finding your passion can be bad advice

When you are at a loss at what to do with your life, you may have been given the well-intentioned advice to "just find your passion," as if it is something you can just dig up from the ground. Now, new Stanford research explains why this can be bad advice.

The Whole Human

Why you should eat popcorn with chopsticks – and other psychological tricks to make life more enjoyable

In a series of studies soon to be published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, we found that consuming things in life in unconventional ways enhances enjoyment of them. This is where chopsticks come in.

According to Science

How many different types of smiles are there?

You’d be forgiven for thinking that counting the different types of smile would be straightforward. It’s anything but. The total number of different types of smile is frequently debated.

The Whole Human

This is why you’ll keep doing something you hate

When we are trapped in a sunk-cost fallacy, we get too stubborn to walk away from an objectively bad decision. We will not cut our losses and run, because we have invested too much money, time, and energy towards it. Behavioral scientists have long called us out on this trap.

The Whole Human

11 powerful habits of truly happy people

When we think of happiness, we typically think of things that bring us immediate pleasure—a decadent meal, a favorite book, or a relaxing day on the beach. These pleasures do bring happiness, but only temporarily. Recent studies have shown that true happiness, or life satisfaction, works a bit differently.

News

Study: Our smiles and frowns do not actually reflect our feelings

Before you go reading too much into your boss's face for clues, know this — that smile or frown doesn't actually mean what you think it means. Research finds that our facial expressions are our tools to telegraph our intentions or goals.

Mental Health

Why predicting suicide is a difficult and complex challenge

As a scientist who has focused on this question for the past decade, I should have a pretty good idea of who is and isn’t going to die by suicide. But the sad truth is, I don’t. The sadder truth is, neither do any other suicide experts, psychiatrists or physicians.

Health

This is how often you need to be cleaning your germ-infected phone

We should be paying the same level of concern to cleaning our screens as we already do to washing our hands in bathrooms, germ experts warn.

Communication

Women’s voices are significantly lower than they used to be

New research shows that women's voices today are significantly deeper than previous generations and that is because of roles shifting and power dynamics.

News

This is why not taking that job we wanted haunts us

When you look back over your career regrets, you're more likely to be haunted by the job you did not take than the work mistakes you actually did make. Why? A new paper published in the journal Emotion has looked into why inaction stings longer than other failures.