Danny Rubin

Danny Rubin

Danny Rubin is an award-winning author and speaker on business communication skills. His book, Wait, How Do I Write This Email?, is a collection of 100+ templates for networking, the job search and LinkedIn. Visit DannyHRubin.com to read more of his blog posts and connect with him on Twitter.

Articles by Danny Rubin

Office Life

On obstacles, ‘the process’ and pivot points

Take chances, put yourself out there and watch what the market tells you. There’s a signal in all the noise, and if you listen closely you’ll find it.

Communication

Is it ‘between you and I’ or ‘between you and me’?

Grammar is tough, and sometimes we understand the rules but not all the way. This is the correct way to say and write certain things.

Templates

The best closing lines for 5 critical work emails

To help people compose emails with impact, here’s a short guide on how to conclude each message based on a particular scenario.

Communication

Phone calls, saying ‘no’ and staying ready

Be bold. Make calls. Make a checklist. Address every item. Don’t skimp on the preparation phase. Your future self will thank you.

Templates

How to apply for a job even if the company isn’t hiring

You can wait for hiring opportunities or you can grab them. A polished email introduction to a company could change the entire course of your career.

Words at Work

Leaders: Stop speaking with the royal ‘you’

My "royal you" assessment: When we are asked to talk about ourselves, we feel funny using “I” because it feels like bragging or speaking out of turn.

Communication

6 writing mistakes leaders should never make

Here are six writing mistakes leaders often make. Correct the errors, and your reputation throughout the office will improve.

Success

The most important trait among successful people will surprise you

This is what matters more than any other talent or trait.

Self-Help

On being tenacious, staying patient, and talking face-to-face

On being tenacious, staying patient, and talking face-to-face: Be your own best advocate. Live for tomorrow. Meet in person in our digital age.

Success

16 career decisions that make no logical sense

Avoid these 16 poor choices, and your chances at success will improve.

Productivity

Everything I know I learned on the first day of school

Millions of kids feel the same butterflies that come with change. In hindsight, the first day of school — no matter the grade — offers the building blocks for successful adulthood. With a nod to Robert Fulghum’s classic bestseller “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” this is what we learn on day one.

Templates

How leaders should write a ‘long-term vision’ email

When you write a “big idea” or long-term planning email, the danger is to write too much. If your employees open an email and are smacked right away with 14 giant paragraphs that scroll and scroll, they will recoil and dread the 30 minutes they need to spend sifting through your manifesto.

Templates

How a manager should critique an employee’s work

Constructive criticism is essential for team dynamics. If your employees don’t improve a little each day, then the company as a whole will languish. Still, there’s a proper way to dispense critiques while you manage the relationship and remain in control as a leader.

Networking

The simple approach to powerful networking conversations

“When Ali spoke to you, he made it seem as if you were the only one in the room.” Even a small action can make a very big impact when networking.

The Whole Human

10 phrases we should always say no matter how crazy our lives become

Sadly, we can’t slow down our world, even though eating alone at our desks makes us less creative. Nevertheless, below are 10 phrases we should always find ourselves saying — no matter how crazy life becomes.

Job Search

How do I use the right keywords on my resume?

On a resume, lead with your skills because, in the crowded, competitive world of online job applications, your skill set matters above all. Somewhere, a robot is waiting to call your name.

Communication

2 words every public speaker should avoid at all costs

When we fall back on the same words during a speech, the audience senses it right away. People start to think, “He’s really doing that a lot. Kind of annoying.” What’s “that”? A distracting tic or habit.

Office Life

Here’s an email template to help you settle a team dispute

An email chain doesn’t allow for productive dialogue and employees can read a sentence the wrong way and become offended or turned off. That’s why, to settle a dispute, email should be used to plan a face-to-face conversation.

Productivity

On shutting my mouth, knowing my room and looking out for #1

Who can you ask for advice this week? Once the person starts to drop knowledge bombs, you need to nod furiously, take notes and generally be a sponge. Never stop absorbing.

Communication

How to explain a complex topic in simple terms

Strong writing skills are paramount. You don’t want to confuse people when you try to break down a difficult topic. On the flip side, employees will appreciate how you simplified the issue and, in doing so, valued their time and attention.

Networking

On meeting new people, following up, and being teachable

Here’s a powerful networking truth: Everyone you ever meet matters. No matter when someone crosses your path, you never know when they might come back around.

How To

How to (actually) find your purpose

To find your purpose, commit to working on what you love to do every week for at least two years. There are no shortcuts to reach enlightenment.

Templates

The email every leader should write

Are you a “rising star” at your job or an organization outside of work? To cement your “leader” status, use this email template and let others show what they can do.

Communication

How to use the right tone in emails

Your messages are more than facts and figures about the business. Each word carries tone and significance, and employees scrutinize every sentence in search of meaning.

Templates

How to ask for a networking meeting with a coworker

If you want to brainstorm or learn from a coworker, ask politely for the person’s time but include parameters on when the meeting should happen.