And NASA responded.
levelling up

9-year-old ‘Guardian of the Galaxy’ applied to NASA job listing

A 9-year old who reportedly calls himself “Guardian of the Galaxy” shot for the stars in the form of a handwritten letter applying for NASA’s “Planetary Protection Officer” job listing.

In the message dated Aug. 3, fourth-grader Jack Davis, explained some of the reasons he thinks he’s the right candidate.

“One of the reasons is my sister says I am an alien also.) I have seen almost all the space and alien movies I can see. I have also seen the show Marvel Agents of shield and hope to see the movie Men in Black.”

In an interview with ABC News, Davis said he wrote the message because he believes it would be “really cool” to be employed by the organization.

He also acknowledged his age, telling ABC News that “I feel like — I am the only one who really wants a job at NASA this young.”

How did NASA respond?

NASA reported that the student got a call from Planetary Research Director Jonathan Rall and a letter from Planetary Science Director Jim Green.

While Green didn’t promise Davis the job, he wrote in his note that NASA is constantly seeking out “bright future scientists and engineers to help us.” He also encouraged Davis to succeed academically and told him that NASA wishes to have him there “one of these days.”

NASA tweeted about the boy’s effort to get the organization’s attention on Aug. 4, and the NASA Education account has tweeted about it since.

NASA’s Planetary Science Director Jim Green commented in a statement:

“At NASA, we love to teach kids about space and inspire them to be the next generation of explorers,” Green said. “Think of it as a gravity assist — a boost that may positively and forever change a person’s course in life, and our footprint in the universe.”

What is a “Planetary Protection Officer”?

It’s easy to imagine that the person who gets this position will act as a space crusader, armed with a gigantic weapon to defend all things planetary.

Think again. NASA reported that the job “may not be in real-life what the title conjures up.”

Green described why the position is significant in his letter to the Davis.

“It’s about protecting Earth from tiny microbes when we bring back samples from the Moon, asteroids and Mars,” Green wrote.

The job description also provides specific details about the full-time role, including that the person who scores the job will earn $124,406 to $187,000 annually.

How the people of Earth reacted

This user agreed with Davis’s self-given title.

This user’s son reportedly also had his eyes on the job.

After calling it “rejection,” this user later clarified that he “was just making a joke.”

And this user offered words of encouragement.