Do you love your job enough to do it for free? This man does. | Ladders

He has only ever taken 19 days away from his most beloved task.
Distractions

Do you love your job enough to do it for free? This man does.

One man will stop at nothing to get other people’s tax returns done— even though he’s not getting paid to do them.

At 82 years old, full-time volunteer Andrew Benjamin has done 50,000 tax returns over the last 35 years, as estimated by the nonprofit he works for, and reported by KARE 11 in Minnesota.

Retired now, he used to work in the finance industry. He “often” works twice a day, and is reportedly one of 500 “volunteer tax preparers” at nonprofit Prepare + Prosper in St. Paul.

Apparently, not even sickness could hold Benjamin back.  He reportedly had lung cancer two years ago, but only stopped doing tax returns when he was hospitalized for for 19 days.

“Right during the middle of tax season, I was really mad…I kept thinking about all the people I was not able to help with their taxes,” Benjamin told KARE 11.

The holiday season also doesn’t seem to give him reason to slow down, and he works on his time away from Prepare + Prosper.

After every Christmas, tax returns he prepares for no cost at a “community center” on his free day pile up on his dining room table at home. His wife reportedly lets him keep them there. Some people also leave their tax returns at Benjamin’s home.

The popularity of volunteer work

Many older Americans How does Benjamin’s time spent working for free stack up?

“About 62.6 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2014 and September 2015,” according to a 2015 Economic News Release by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Working people also took the time to volunteer.

“Among the employed, 27.2 percent volunteered during the year ending in September 2015. By comparison, 23.3 percent of unemployed persons and 21.4 percent of those not in the labor force volunteered,” the organization reported in the same news release.

But how convenient would it be to have someone like Benjamin around during tax season?