Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

Woods Hole, Massachusetts, United States
Woods Hole United States
Founded:
1930

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI, acronym pronounced /'hu?i/ HOO-ee) is a private, nonprofit research and higher education facility dedicated to the study of all aspects of marine science and engineering and to the education of marine researchers. Established in 1930 in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, it is the largest independent oceanographic research institution in the U.S., with staff and students numbering about 1,000. Wikipedia

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

Woods Hole, Massachusetts, United States
Woods Hole United States
Founded:
1930

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI, acronym pronounced /'hu?i/ HOO-ee) is a private, nonprofit research and higher education facility dedicated to the study of all aspects of marine science and engineering and to the education of marine researchers. Established in 1930 in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, it is the largest independent oceanographic research institution in the U.S., with staff and students numbering about 1,000. Wikipedia

Aug 30, 1:31 PM

What looks like a painting of R/V Neil Armstrong is actually a photo taken earlier this month in waters off of Greenland by a new camera system called IceCam. It consists of five cameras attached to the surface mooring of WHOIs Global Irminger Sea Array, part of the NSF-sponsored Ocean Observatories Initiative. The IceCam provides a 300-degree view of the instruments on the moorings tower and of the ocean surface from the mooring to the horizon. Near real-time images transmitted to shore from IceCam will give WHOI scientists and engineers their first look at the ice that has damaged the mooring every winterinformation they will use to mitigate ice damage in the future. #alltheshipsatsea #scienceiscool #inthefield #oceanscience

Aug 28, 11:18 AM

The petals of these delicate golden flowers are actually individual animals. They are clones of colonial invertebrates called star tunicates (Botryllus schlosseri). Tunicates, also known as ascidians or sea squirts, can form dense mats on the submerged undersides of piers and boats, aquatic plants, and even the shells of snails and other marine life. They compete for space with other members of the biofouling community, such as barnacles and musselsand one another. This star tunicate has grown on top of another colony of sea squirts (the bright orange Botrylloides violaceus). (Photo by Kirstin Meyer, #WHOI) #tunicate #seasquirt #startunicate #biofouling #KnowYourOcean

Aug 24, 11:35 AM

#LifeWithoutSunlight In 1977, a group of scientists photographing the seafloor from R/V Knorr came across an astounding sight: hot water pouring from hydrothermal vents teeming with life. Their discovery fundamentally changed our view of the planet and of life on it: In particular, scientists learned that life could evolve to survive without the help of sunlight and photosynthesis, including bacteria that metabolize chemicals in the fluids flowing from the vents and that sustain organisms like these tubeworms.(Photo courtesy of Stefan Sievert, WHOI/NSF/HOV Alvin, 2014) #WHOI #hydrothermalvents #zoarcidfish #tubeworms #GoDeep #DiveIntoDiscovery

Aug 22, 11:29 AM

Surface moorings in the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative have buoys that are among the largest and most complex platforms of their type deployed in the ocean. The top of the buoy supports instruments that monitor atmospheric and meteorological conditions as well as solar panels and wind generators to power instruments on and beneath the buoy. Instruments below the buoy''s waterline and in the instrument cage suspended from the black electro-mechanical chain record oceanographic data in key locations around the world. (Photo by Thomas Kleindinst, #WHOI) @nsf #OOI #surfacemooring #buoy #longtermmeasurements #KnowYourOcean