Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia National Laboratories

Albuquerque, NM, United States
Albuquerque United States

The Sandia National Laboratories, managed and operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin), are two major United States Department of Energy research and development national laboratories. Their primary mission is to develop, engineer, and test the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons. Wikipedia

Sandia National Laboratories

Albuquerque, NM, United States
Albuquerque United States

The Sandia National Laboratories, managed and operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin), are two major United States Department of Energy research and development national laboratories. Their primary mission is to develop, engineer, and test the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons. Wikipedia

  • Oct 25 at 6:06 PM
    Some SERIIUS tech Sandia engineers have developed new fractal-like, concentrating solar power receivers that are up to 20% more effective at absorbing sunlight than current technology. . When light is reflected off of a flat surface, its gone, said Sandia engineer Cliff Ho. On a flat receiver design, 5% or more of the concentrated sunlight reflects away. So we configured the panels of tubes in a radial or louvered pattern that traps the light at different scales. We wanted the light to reflect, and then reflect again toward the interior of the receiver and get absorbed, sort of like the walls of a sound-proof room. . The receivers were designed and studied as part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project and are being applied to Sandias work for the Solar Energy Research Institute for India and the United States (SERIIUS). . SERIIUS is a five-year project co-led by the Indian Institute of Science and @nationalrenewableenergylab, sponsored by @energy and the government of India, that aims to develop and improve cost effective solar technology for both countries by addressing the barriers and challenges of each market.
  • Oct 21 at 11:27 AM
    SKY-HIGH RESEARCH Sandia aerial system expert Dave Novick examines an octocopter prior to the first joint balloon-unmanned aerial system, or drone, flight. By flying the two together, researchers are able to get Arctic atmospheric temperatures with better location control than ever before. This not only provides more precise data for weather and climate models, but being able to effectively operate UASs in the Arctic is important for national security. . The UAS and the balloon really complement each other in that the UAS has a smaller flight time, but its much more spatially diverse. The tethered balloon can stay up for a long time, giving you a lot of data, but its not easily mobile, said Sandia atmospheric scientist Dari Dexheimer. The balloon is blown by the wind, to the limits of the tether, but the UAS can be directed to precise GPS coordinates. . Information on temperature of the atmosphere is critical for predicting weather, monitoring severe weather and improving climate models. Unlike tethered balloons or weather balloons, UASs dont require helium, a nonrenewable resource, and can take off with less preparation.
  • Oct 12 at 7:54 PM
    HOT SCIENCE A cool flame may sound contradictory, but its an important element of diesel combustion one that, once properly understood, could enable better engine designs with higher efficiency and fewer emissions. . A ""cool"" flame burns at about half a typical flame''s 2,200 Kelvin temperature. While cool flames were first observed in the early 1800s, their properties and benefits for diesel engine design have only recently been investigated. This Sandia teams research is showing that these cool flames accelerate the formation of ignition kernels tiny localized sites of high temperature that seed a fully burning flame. . By better understanding the physics of this ignition chemistry the researchers are developing computer models that will one day optimize combustion efficiency and reduce pollution in diesel engines.
  • Oct 5 at 5:00 PM
    On point Researcher Ronen Polsky positions a prototype 3D-printed microneedle holder on the arm of Sandia science writer Mollie Rappe. This painless, wearable microneedle tech could be the future of immediate, personalized healthcare. . Only a few hairsbreadths wide, the sensor''s microneedles can sample the clear, colorless fluid - called interstitial fluid - between cells in the middle layer of skin. Important biomarkers in this fluid, such as electrolytes, salts, glucose, and lactose, would make it possible to monitor and diagnose a spectrum of diseases and disorders. . As small, wearable sensor, the tech could help endurance athletes meet their training goals by avoiding dehydration, aid soldiers by alerting them before exhaustion could compromise a mission, or even be part of a sense-and-respond device that detects high glucose levels and automatically delivers insulin.

Oct 25, 6:06 PM

Some SERIIUS tech Sandia engineers have developed new fractal-like, concentrating solar power receivers that are up to 20% more effective at absorbing sunlight than current technology. . When light is reflected off of a flat surface, its gone, said Sandia engineer Cliff Ho. On a flat receiver design, 5% or more of the concentrated sunlight reflects away. So we configured the panels of tubes in a radial or louvered pattern that traps the light at different scales. We wanted the light to reflect, and then reflect again toward the interior of the receiver and get absorbed, sort of like the walls of a sound-proof room. . The receivers were designed and studied as part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project and are being applied to Sandias work for the Solar Energy Research Institute for India and the United States (SERIIUS). . SERIIUS is a five-year project co-led by the Indian Institute of Science and @nationalrenewableenergylab, sponsored by @energy and the government of India, that aims to develop and improve cost effective solar technology for both countries by addressing the barriers and challenges of each market.

Oct 21, 11:27 AM

SKY-HIGH RESEARCH Sandia aerial system expert Dave Novick examines an octocopter prior to the first joint balloon-unmanned aerial system, or drone, flight. By flying the two together, researchers are able to get Arctic atmospheric temperatures with better location control than ever before. This not only provides more precise data for weather and climate models, but being able to effectively operate UASs in the Arctic is important for national security. . The UAS and the balloon really complement each other in that the UAS has a smaller flight time, but its much more spatially diverse. The tethered balloon can stay up for a long time, giving you a lot of data, but its not easily mobile, said Sandia atmospheric scientist Dari Dexheimer. The balloon is blown by the wind, to the limits of the tether, but the UAS can be directed to precise GPS coordinates. . Information on temperature of the atmosphere is critical for predicting weather, monitoring severe weather and improving climate models. Unlike tethered balloons or weather balloons, UASs dont require helium, a nonrenewable resource, and can take off with less preparation.

Oct 12, 7:54 PM

HOT SCIENCE A cool flame may sound contradictory, but its an important element of diesel combustion one that, once properly understood, could enable better engine designs with higher efficiency and fewer emissions. . A ""cool"" flame burns at about half a typical flame''s 2,200 Kelvin temperature. While cool flames were first observed in the early 1800s, their properties and benefits for diesel engine design have only recently been investigated. This Sandia teams research is showing that these cool flames accelerate the formation of ignition kernels tiny localized sites of high temperature that seed a fully burning flame. . By better understanding the physics of this ignition chemistry the researchers are developing computer models that will one day optimize combustion efficiency and reduce pollution in diesel engines.

Oct 5, 5:00 PM

On point Researcher Ronen Polsky positions a prototype 3D-printed microneedle holder on the arm of Sandia science writer Mollie Rappe. This painless, wearable microneedle tech could be the future of immediate, personalized healthcare. . Only a few hairsbreadths wide, the sensor''s microneedles can sample the clear, colorless fluid - called interstitial fluid - between cells in the middle layer of skin. Important biomarkers in this fluid, such as electrolytes, salts, glucose, and lactose, would make it possible to monitor and diagnose a spectrum of diseases and disorders. . As small, wearable sensor, the tech could help endurance athletes meet their training goals by avoiding dehydration, aid soldiers by alerting them before exhaustion could compromise a mission, or even be part of a sense-and-respond device that detects high glucose levels and automatically delivers insulin.

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