Open Society Foundation

Open Society Foundation

Open Society Foundations (OSF), formerly the Open Society Institute, is an international grantmaking network founded by business magnate George Soros. Open Society Foundations financially support civil society groups around the world, with a stated aim of advancing justice, education, public health and independent media. Wikipedia

Open Society Foundation

Open Society Foundations (OSF), formerly the Open Society Institute, is an international grantmaking network founded by business magnate George Soros. Open Society Foundations financially support civil society groups around the world, with a stated aim of advancing justice, education, public health and independent media. Wikipedia

Jul 31, 9:15 PM

Inside the studios of Eastleighwood, a community association and film production company located in Eastleigh, a neighbourhood in Kenyas capital, Nairobi. Often stigmatized for its purported connections with radical Islam and terrorist group Al-Shabaab, Eastleigh is a nonetheless vibrant neighbourhood hosting a growing population of Somali refugees and Somali Kenyans (ethnic Somalis have also lived in the northeastern part of Kenya.) Eastleighwood produces fiction and documentary films, hoping to showcase Somali culture while helping develop career opportunities in the film and communications industry for local youth. Photo by @huberthayaud. Text by @flaviehalais #RefugeeEconomics is a reporting project documenting the lives of refugees in East Africa as they survive, and sometimes thrive, through work and business. Forced migration has profound social and economic consequences for the regions and countries to which displaced people flee, impacting job markets, housing, consumption, public resources, trade, and more. These consequences arent necessarily negative. Refugees and other displaced populations can stimulate consumption, create jobs for themselves and others, and actively participate in expanding trade networks, for instance. Yet very little is known about the true impact of refugees on local and national economies, leaving governments and humanitarian agencies uncertain about shaping efficient policies and programs, and citizens with no answers to their questions about the cost of hosting refugees. For decades, Kenya has received refugees from neighbouring countries including Somalia, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. They live mainly in of the countrys two refugee camps, Dadaab and Kakuma, and in the capital, Nairobi, with little to no support from aid agencies. In 2016, Flavie Halais and I travelled to Kenya to meet some of them. Learn more at www.refugee-economics.com #opensociety #RefugeeEconomics #refugees #refugeeswelcome #eastleigh #Kenya #Nairobi #migration #everydayafrica

Jul 31, 3:01 PM

Vendors and customers mingle in a store located in Eastleigh, a neighbourhood in Kenyas capital, Nairobi, increasingly populated by refugees and migrants. Fuelled by remittances and foreign investment, Eastleighs businesses include goods that are imported from China and Dubai, and sold in retail or bulk to buyers coming from all over East Africa. Although official figures have never been released, it is thought that Eastleigh brings millions of dollars each year to the Kenyan economy in tax revenue. Photo by @huberthayaud. Text by @flaviehalais #RefugeeEconomics is a reporting project documenting the lives of refugees in East Africa as they survive, and sometimes thrive, through work and business. Forced migration has profound social and economic consequences for the regions and countries to which displaced people flee, impacting job markets, housing, consumption, public resources, trade, and more. These consequences arent necessarily negative. Refugees and other displaced populations can stimulate consumption, create jobs for themselves and others, and actively participate in expanding trade networks, for instance. Yet very little is known about the true impact of refugees on local and national economies, leaving governments and humanitarian agencies uncertain about shaping efficient policies and programs, and citizens with no answers to their questions about the cost of hosting refugees. For decades, Kenya has received refugees from neighbouring countries including Somalia, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. They live mainly in of the countrys two refugee camps, Dadaab and Kakuma, and in the capital, Nairobi, with little to no support from aid agencies. In 2016, Flavie Halais and I travelled to Kenya to meet some of them. Learn more at www.refugee-economics.com #opensociety #RefugeeEconomics #refugees #refugeeswelcome #eastleigh #Kenya #Nairobi #street #migration #everydayafrica

Jul 31, 0:22 PM

A street vendor in Eastleigh, a neighbourhood in Kenyas capital, Nairobi, increasingly populated by refugees and migrants. Fuelled by remittances and foreign investment from the Somali diaspora, Easlteighs booming businesses range from real estate to clothing, electronic goods and khat, a psychotropic herb popular in East Africa. While mostly taking place in multi-floor malls, trade spills over into the neighbourhoods busy streets. Photo by @huberthayaud. Text by @flaviehalais #RefugeeEconomics is a reporting project documenting the lives of refugees in East Africa as they survive, and sometimes thrive, through work and business. Forced migration has profound social and economic consequences for the regions and countries to which displaced people flee, impacting job markets, housing, consumption, public resources, trade, and more. These consequences arent necessarily negative. Refugees and other displaced populations can stimulate consumption, create jobs for themselves and others, and actively participate in expanding trade networks, for instance. Yet very little is known about the true impact of refugees on local and national economies, leaving governments and humanitarian agencies uncertain about shaping efficient policies and programs, and citizens with no answers to their questions about the cost of hosting refugees. For decades, Kenya has received refugees from neighbouring countries including Somalia, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. They live mainly in of the countrys two refugee camps, Dadaab and Kakuma, and in the capital, Nairobi, with little to no support from aid agencies. In 2016, Flavie Halais and I travelled to Kenya to meet some of them. Learn more at www.refugee-economics.com #opensociety #RefugeeEconomics #refugees #refugeeswelcome #eastleigh #Kenya #Nairobi #street #migration #everydayafrica

Jul 31, 7:43 AM

Street vendors and customers meet in a street of Eastleigh, a neighbourhood in Kenyas capital, Nairobi. Long a place of trade between Kenyans of various tribes and Somalis, Eastleigh is increasingly populated with refugees from Somalia and other nearby countries, like Ethiopia and Eritrea. Fuelled by remittances and foreign investment from the Somali diaspora, businesses located in Eastleigh are thought to bring millions of dollars each year to the Kenyan economy in tax revenue, although official figures have never been publicly released. Photo by @huberthayaud. Text by @flaviehalais #RefugeeEconomics is a reporting project documenting the lives of refugees in East Africa as they survive, and sometimes thrive, through work and business. Forced migration has profound social and economic consequences for the regions and countries to which displaced people flee, impacting job markets, housing, consumption, public resources, trade, and more. These consequences arent necessarily negative. Refugees and other displaced populations can stimulate consumption, create jobs for themselves and others, and actively participate in expanding trade networks, for instance. Yet very little is known about the true impact of refugees on local and national economies, leaving governments and humanitarian agencies uncertain about shaping efficient policies and programs, and citizens with no answers to their questions about the cost of hosting refugees. For decades, Kenya has received refugees from neighbouring countries including Somalia, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. They live mainly in of the countrys two refugee camps, Dadaab and Kakuma, and in the capital, Nairobi, with little to no support from aid agencies. In 2016, Flavie Halais and I travelled to Kenya to meet some of them. Learn more at www.refugee-economics.com #opensociety #RefugeeEconomics #refugees #refugeeswelcome #eastleigh #Kenya #Nairobi #street #migration #everydayafrica