Barnabas Health

Barnabas Health

Saint Barnabas Medical Center (SBMC), an affiliate of RWJBarnabas Health (formerly known as Barnabas Health and Saint Barnabas Health Care System), is a 577-bed non-profit major teaching hospital located in Livingston, New Jersey. It is the oldest and largest nonprofit, nonsectarian hospital in New Jersey. Wikipedia

Barnabas Health

Saint Barnabas Medical Center (SBMC), an affiliate of RWJBarnabas Health (formerly known as Barnabas Health and Saint Barnabas Health Care System), is a 577-bed non-profit major teaching hospital located in Livingston, New Jersey. It is the oldest and largest nonprofit, nonsectarian hospital in New Jersey. Wikipedia

  • Nov 1 at 6:05 PM
    At 2 a.m. this Sunday, Nov. 5, Americans will fall back as #DaylightSavingTime ends. We will gain an hour of sleep, because the change occurs in the middle of the night, but moving our internal clock will alter the internal clock running in the background of our brain, potentially taking a toll on our bodies. For many, the impact of the fall time change can mimic the effects of jet lag. You may feel groggy and irritable, have headaches, experience fatigue, have a loss of productivity and alertness, experience difficulty concentrating, and have increased symptoms of seasonal affect disorder and depression. The effects can last for days. Dr. Jag Sunderram, medical director of the Comprehensive Sleep Disorders Center at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, offers ways to minimize the effects of the upcoming change:
  • Nov 1 at 11:00 AM
    The 2018 Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment period is now open! Visit https://goo.gl/ESKAUn for more information on how to #GetCovered #StayCovered
  • Oct 31 at 4:43 PM
    Happy Halloween! While planning to take your superheroes, ghosts, emojis and other characters out Trick or Treating today, its important for parents and caregivers to note that Halloween is among the leading holidays that produces the most emergency room visits each year and to be extra vigilant of potential hazards to prevent any accidents or injuries. Dr. Deven Unadkat, medical director, Emergency Services at Jersey City Medical Center and the Satellite Emergency Department at RWJBarnabas Health at Bayonne, offers the following tips to help you enjoy trick-or-treating safely: While Trick-or-Treating Stay alert. Put electronic devices down and keep your head up while walking to avoid falls and injuries, says Dr. Unadkat. Always use sidewalks when possible and walk in groups and instructed kids to wait until they are home to eat any treats so they can be properly checked. More tips: Accompany young children while trick-or-treating If you have an older child going alone, review a safe route for them to take and agree on a time for when they will return home Only go to houses with a porch light on or with Halloween decorations out Never enter a home or car for a treat Be cautious around animals Avoid short cuts through alleys or someones yard. Stay on well-lit streets After Trick-or-Treating Adults should sort and check all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items as well as remove any items that can trigger a food allergy, recommends Dr. Unadkat. Never eat homemade or home wrapped treats from strangers since ingredients and preparation methods are unknown. Finally, if you or someone you know is experiencing a medical emergency, call 911.
  • Oct 30 at 6:02 PM
    Halloween, one of the most anticipated days of the year for kids, is almost here! While planning to take your superheroes, ghosts and emojis out Trick or Treating, its important for parents and caregivers to note that Halloween is among the leading holidays that produces the most emergency room visits each year. Dr. Deven Unadkat, medical director of Emergency Services for Jersey City Medical Center and the Satellite Emergency Department at RWJBarnabas Health at Bayonne, offers the following refresher on preparing to #TrickOrTreat to ensure a happy and safe #Halloween: Pedestrian collisions with vehicles are a leading cause of hospital visits on Halloween, so plan for bright or reflective costumes, advises Dr. Unadkat. Put reflective tape on costumes and bags to ensure drivers can see you when it gets dark. Additional tips: Make sure all costumes and accessories are fire-resistant Wear comfortable shoes and make sure they fit and costumes dont drag to prevent tripping or entanglement Masks can limit eyesight consider non-toxic makeup or hats for a safer alternative Any swords, knives or costume accessories should be short, soft and flexible Bring cellphones and flashlights along Review with children how to call 9-1-1 if they get lost or have an emergency

Nov 1, 6:05 PM

At 2 a.m. this Sunday, Nov. 5, Americans will fall back as #DaylightSavingTime ends. We will gain an hour of sleep, because the change occurs in the middle of the night, but moving our internal clock will alter the internal clock running in the background of our brain, potentially taking a toll on our bodies. For many, the impact of the fall time change can mimic the effects of jet lag. You may feel groggy and irritable, have headaches, experience fatigue, have a loss of productivity and alertness, experience difficulty concentrating, and have increased symptoms of seasonal affect disorder and depression. The effects can last for days. Dr. Jag Sunderram, medical director of the Comprehensive Sleep Disorders Center at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, offers ways to minimize the effects of the upcoming change:

Nov 1, 11:00 AM

The 2018 Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment period is now open! Visit https://goo.gl/ESKAUn for more information on how to #GetCovered #StayCovered

Oct 31, 4:43 PM

Happy Halloween! While planning to take your superheroes, ghosts, emojis and other characters out Trick or Treating today, its important for parents and caregivers to note that Halloween is among the leading holidays that produces the most emergency room visits each year and to be extra vigilant of potential hazards to prevent any accidents or injuries. Dr. Deven Unadkat, medical director, Emergency Services at Jersey City Medical Center and the Satellite Emergency Department at RWJBarnabas Health at Bayonne, offers the following tips to help you enjoy trick-or-treating safely: While Trick-or-Treating Stay alert. Put electronic devices down and keep your head up while walking to avoid falls and injuries, says Dr. Unadkat. Always use sidewalks when possible and walk in groups and instructed kids to wait until they are home to eat any treats so they can be properly checked. More tips: Accompany young children while trick-or-treating If you have an older child going alone, review a safe route for them to take and agree on a time for when they will return home Only go to houses with a porch light on or with Halloween decorations out Never enter a home or car for a treat Be cautious around animals Avoid short cuts through alleys or someones yard. Stay on well-lit streets After Trick-or-Treating Adults should sort and check all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items as well as remove any items that can trigger a food allergy, recommends Dr. Unadkat. Never eat homemade or home wrapped treats from strangers since ingredients and preparation methods are unknown. Finally, if you or someone you know is experiencing a medical emergency, call 911.

Oct 30, 6:02 PM

Halloween, one of the most anticipated days of the year for kids, is almost here! While planning to take your superheroes, ghosts and emojis out Trick or Treating, its important for parents and caregivers to note that Halloween is among the leading holidays that produces the most emergency room visits each year. Dr. Deven Unadkat, medical director of Emergency Services for Jersey City Medical Center and the Satellite Emergency Department at RWJBarnabas Health at Bayonne, offers the following refresher on preparing to #TrickOrTreat to ensure a happy and safe #Halloween: Pedestrian collisions with vehicles are a leading cause of hospital visits on Halloween, so plan for bright or reflective costumes, advises Dr. Unadkat. Put reflective tape on costumes and bags to ensure drivers can see you when it gets dark. Additional tips: Make sure all costumes and accessories are fire-resistant Wear comfortable shoes and make sure they fit and costumes dont drag to prevent tripping or entanglement Masks can limit eyesight consider non-toxic makeup or hats for a safer alternative Any swords, knives or costume accessories should be short, soft and flexible Bring cellphones and flashlights along Review with children how to call 9-1-1 if they get lost or have an emergency