American Commercial Lines

American Commercial Lines

Jeffersonville, Indiana, United States
Jeffersonville United States
Revenue:
$846 million

American Commercial Lines

Jeffersonville, Indiana, United States
Jeffersonville United States
Revenue:
$846 million
  • Oct 25 at 10:26 PM
    ACBL teammate completes marathon! Next is Peter's own account of his marathon experience exactly how we received it. Truly worth reading in its entirety: Capt. Morris, Mr. Groth, Mr. Masters, Mr. Lay, I want to give you guys an update on the race! First. Thank you Mr. Masters Capt. Morris and Mr. Lay for your generous donations, running for the kids at St. Jude brings real energy when you need it most. Hearing "Way to go St. Jude's hero! You're my hero!" definitely gets you moving! In my last email to Mr. Groth I pointed out how much of a struggle this years journey has been and that this year I my hope was to simply finish rather than risk injury. I have been plagued with chronic hip pain during long runs and was of the mindset to simply run the best I can without putting myself at risk of injury. The night before the race my mom texted me Isaiah 40:31 "he will carry you on wings of eagles, you will run and not grow weary you will walk and not faint" As my wife dropped me off at the Pentagon she said "wings of eagles!" This was to prove prophetic and miraculous! I placed myself near the 3.5-4 hr estimated finish time being hopeful for divine intervention. The howitzer rang out at 0805 and so the mass of 20000+ runners began forward momentum. It was exhilarating as the thrill of the race welled up in me. I began a slow trot to the starting line and noticed the front half of my left foot was totally numb. I broke a rule of thumb for marathoners "nothing new on race day" I was wearing brand new shoes. It was two miles before the shoe loosened up on its own to feel more normal. My legs hurt, they hurt throughout like growing pains. I had felt this pain before and it has become intolerable but today it was just tolerable. I ran through Rosslyn and over the Key bridge into Georgetown feeling the miles underfoot go by at surprising speed. I checked my watch (garmin forerunner 15 GPS watch) I had it set to check my pace, it read 7:15/mile. This is fast for me, very fast. My usual marathon race pace is between 8:30 and 9:00/ miles. I ran on considering slowing down so I don't burn out but the pain in my legs was slackening as I descended through Rock Creek Park towards the Kennedy Center, I was moving fast and feeling better. As the road leveled off the pain returned but the pace remained around 7:30-7:40. I rounded Hanes Point at the half way mark with the goal of not stopping until I returned to Virginia. At this point I had every intension of walking a portion of the race but I knew if I stopped to walk it was likely that I would not be able to run again. So I had to make the bridges, miles 20-21. I approached the Washington Monument and had slowed down. I was now being passed up by runners around me. I was hitting "The Wall" as they say at mile 17. My fuel reserves were depleted and my muscles are eating themselves. I continued, staying focused on the road ahead and praying out loud against the pain. As I approached the Capitol building I knew the turn around was soon and the road back to Virginia not 2 miles more. The sun was out now and the heat rose. Sweat poured from the bill of my cap. As I ran past Jefferson and on to the 395 bridge those around me began to drop to a very lite jog then fade quickly to a walk. I kept saying "only another mile and you'll be over the bridge just keep running". At this point I had stopped checking my speed and was only focused on getting over the bridge. I neared the intersection of highways on the Virgina side of the bridge and ate some jelly beans and downed the last of my water. "Only 5 more miles to go." I told myself. You don't want to quit with only five miles! "You conquered the city! You beat the bridge! Now take Iwo Jima!" I then said to myself "just make it two miles. Just make through Crystal City". I ran on, the beans replenished my fuel stores just enough. I was feeling pretty good. I looked at my watch, 7:40/ mile. 24.34 miles. I had less than 2 miles to go. I fell into a steady pace I felt I could hold as I back tracked toward the Pentagon. As I cleared the Pentagon I had one more pit stop for Gatorade and water 1 mile out. My wife was a competitive rower in high school and college, I could hear her voice in my head saying "OK George, open it up! Full throttle! Last mile! You got THIS LETS GO!" (She calls me George). I opened up the throttle, "balls out" as the steam engines go, and ran my heart out. Passing those who earlier were passing me I was in a zone focused on breathing on foot placement on energy. When I began to falter I'd bark, I'd shout "No you don't!" "You don't stop now!" and run even harder. I ascended the hill approaching Iwo Jima and could see the finish. Those runners around me could see my devotion to a strong finish and shouted words of encouragement, "keep kickin' St. Jude you got this Finish strong KEEP KICKIN'!". I flew through the finish line and high fived the Marine a little harder than he'd expected. I was so focused I hadn't noticed my wife yelling at the top of her lungs not five feet from me as I ran past her towards the finish. I was in-the- zone. I made it, We made it! Without all the support it would surely not have gone that way. Without all the prayers my hips would not have healed, by the way no hip pain since the race! Praise the Lord! I finished strong and shaved a full 22 minutes off last years time. I ran faster than ever at this distance and have renewed hope for Boston or a a coveted sub 3. Thank you for your support. Will you please pass this on to Mr. Lay? He also helped me and I want to make certain he knows what a difference his contribution made. Thank you once again. I cannot express the elation I felt crossing the finish line. And Mike, Thank you for allowing me the time to make this happen. Sincerely, humbly, Peter McMahan
  • Oct 15 at 9:36 PM
    Take a minute and read ACBL teammate, Captain Peter McMahan's motivation for running a marathon. Attached is a link to his St. Jude donation site. http://fundraising.stjude.org/site/TR/Heroes/Heroes?px=3961606&pg=personal&fr_id=72852 Here's Captain McMahan's own words: I run because I love it. Plain and simple. I guess you could say I do it for exercise but really it has more to do with the state of my head than the strength of my legs. All of the pain involved in training pales in comparison to what a person undergoes during the treatment of cancer. I have known, as most of us have, many strong minded people fight cancer and lose. I hate to think of kids going through that. The Hospital at St. Jude is actually developing cures and treatments that have increased the survival rate from 20% to over 80%. That is a remarkable achievement that we as supporters can be thankful for and proud of. I am hopeful that you will help me raise funds for St. Jude and if you have influence in the area of company sponsored support I would be indebted to you for bringing them into the fold as well. Most sincerely, Peter A. McMahan http://fundraising.stjude.org/site/TR/Heroes/Heroes?px=3961606&pg=personal&fr_id=72852
  • Oct 11 at 8:07 PM
    Jeffboat launched the M/V Fort Defiance October 10th, A 2000 horsepower azimuth-drive towboat. It is 70 by 32 by 10 11 with two ZF Marine drive units, and powered by two 1000 HP Caterpillar engines. Electrical systems use a pair of John Deere 4045 TFM85 Tier 3 Generators, each generating 65kw. The M/V Fort Defiance has tankage for 22,200 gallons of fuel, 4,650 gallons of ballast, and 5,800 gallons of potable water. Mark Glaab, Facility Manager at the Cairo Fleet had this to say. Im tickled ****less to get this boat! This is the first new vessel weve ever had at this location, so we are delighted to welcome the M/V Fort Defiance to our fleet. Our captains are interested to see how the z-Drive technology performs for us. The boat gets its name, Fort Defiance, from the geography of the area near the ACBL Fleet in Cairo, IL. Fort Defiance Park sits at the point of confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, so its fitting that the boat is going to work to serve that specific area. Camp Defiance as it was known during the Civil War, was a strategic location where Ulysses S. Grant staged raids into Confederate strongholds in Missouri, Tennessee, and Kentucky, securing early victories for the Union. President Lincoln was so impressed, he decided to promote Grant to the rank of Major General of Volunteers.
  • Sep 28 at 6:42 PM
    Cairo Fleet recently went 556 days incident free. During this time, the Cairo team cleaned 1422 barges, repaired another 2014, and handled a whopping 22,309! This is a new record for incident free days for this team, and they fully intend to break another. Great job, everyone.

Oct 25, 10:26 PM

ACBL teammate completes marathon! Next is Peter's own account of his marathon experience exactly how we received it. Truly worth reading in its entirety: Capt. Morris, Mr. Groth, Mr. Masters, Mr. Lay, I want to give you guys an update on the race! First. Thank you Mr. Masters Capt. Morris and Mr. Lay for your generous donations, running for the kids at St. Jude brings real energy when you need it most. Hearing "Way to go St. Jude's hero! You're my hero!" definitely gets you moving! In my last email to Mr. Groth I pointed out how much of a struggle this years journey has been and that this year I my hope was to simply finish rather than risk injury. I have been plagued with chronic hip pain during long runs and was of the mindset to simply run the best I can without putting myself at risk of injury. The night before the race my mom texted me Isaiah 40:31 "he will carry you on wings of eagles, you will run and not grow weary you will walk and not faint" As my wife dropped me off at the Pentagon she said "wings of eagles!" This was to prove prophetic and miraculous! I placed myself near the 3.5-4 hr estimated finish time being hopeful for divine intervention. The howitzer rang out at 0805 and so the mass of 20000+ runners began forward momentum. It was exhilarating as the thrill of the race welled up in me. I began a slow trot to the starting line and noticed the front half of my left foot was totally numb. I broke a rule of thumb for marathoners "nothing new on race day" I was wearing brand new shoes. It was two miles before the shoe loosened up on its own to feel more normal. My legs hurt, they hurt throughout like growing pains. I had felt this pain before and it has become intolerable but today it was just tolerable. I ran through Rosslyn and over the Key bridge into Georgetown feeling the miles underfoot go by at surprising speed. I checked my watch (garmin forerunner 15 GPS watch) I had it set to check my pace, it read 7:15/mile. This is fast for me, very fast. My usual marathon race pace is between 8:30 and 9:00/ miles. I ran on considering slowing down so I don't burn out but the pain in my legs was slackening as I descended through Rock Creek Park towards the Kennedy Center, I was moving fast and feeling better. As the road leveled off the pain returned but the pace remained around 7:30-7:40. I rounded Hanes Point at the half way mark with the goal of not stopping until I returned to Virginia. At this point I had every intension of walking a portion of the race but I knew if I stopped to walk it was likely that I would not be able to run again. So I had to make the bridges, miles 20-21. I approached the Washington Monument and had slowed down. I was now being passed up by runners around me. I was hitting "The Wall" as they say at mile 17. My fuel reserves were depleted and my muscles are eating themselves. I continued, staying focused on the road ahead and praying out loud against the pain. As I approached the Capitol building I knew the turn around was soon and the road back to Virginia not 2 miles more. The sun was out now and the heat rose. Sweat poured from the bill of my cap. As I ran past Jefferson and on to the 395 bridge those around me began to drop to a very lite jog then fade quickly to a walk. I kept saying "only another mile and you'll be over the bridge just keep running". At this point I had stopped checking my speed and was only focused on getting over the bridge. I neared the intersection of highways on the Virgina side of the bridge and ate some jelly beans and downed the last of my water. "Only 5 more miles to go." I told myself. You don't want to quit with only five miles! "You conquered the city! You beat the bridge! Now take Iwo Jima!" I then said to myself "just make it two miles. Just make through Crystal City". I ran on, the beans replenished my fuel stores just enough. I was feeling pretty good. I looked at my watch, 7:40/ mile. 24.34 miles. I had less than 2 miles to go. I fell into a steady pace I felt I could hold as I back tracked toward the Pentagon. As I cleared the Pentagon I had one more pit stop for Gatorade and water 1 mile out. My wife was a competitive rower in high school and college, I could hear her voice in my head saying "OK George, open it up! Full throttle! Last mile! You got THIS LETS GO!" (She calls me George). I opened up the throttle, "balls out" as the steam engines go, and ran my heart out. Passing those who earlier were passing me I was in a zone focused on breathing on foot placement on energy. When I began to falter I'd bark, I'd shout "No you don't!" "You don't stop now!" and run even harder. I ascended the hill approaching Iwo Jima and could see the finish. Those runners around me could see my devotion to a strong finish and shouted words of encouragement, "keep kickin' St. Jude you got this Finish strong KEEP KICKIN'!". I flew through the finish line and high fived the Marine a little harder than he'd expected. I was so focused I hadn't noticed my wife yelling at the top of her lungs not five feet from me as I ran past her towards the finish. I was in-the- zone. I made it, We made it! Without all the support it would surely not have gone that way. Without all the prayers my hips would not have healed, by the way no hip pain since the race! Praise the Lord! I finished strong and shaved a full 22 minutes off last years time. I ran faster than ever at this distance and have renewed hope for Boston or a a coveted sub 3. Thank you for your support. Will you please pass this on to Mr. Lay? He also helped me and I want to make certain he knows what a difference his contribution made. Thank you once again. I cannot express the elation I felt crossing the finish line. And Mike, Thank you for allowing me the time to make this happen. Sincerely, humbly, Peter McMahan

Oct 15, 9:36 PM

Take a minute and read ACBL teammate, Captain Peter McMahan's motivation for running a marathon. Attached is a link to his St. Jude donation site. http://fundraising.stjude.org/site/TR/Heroes/Heroes?px=3961606&pg=personal&fr_id=72852 Here's Captain McMahan's own words: I run because I love it. Plain and simple. I guess you could say I do it for exercise but really it has more to do with the state of my head than the strength of my legs. All of the pain involved in training pales in comparison to what a person undergoes during the treatment of cancer. I have known, as most of us have, many strong minded people fight cancer and lose. I hate to think of kids going through that. The Hospital at St. Jude is actually developing cures and treatments that have increased the survival rate from 20% to over 80%. That is a remarkable achievement that we as supporters can be thankful for and proud of. I am hopeful that you will help me raise funds for St. Jude and if you have influence in the area of company sponsored support I would be indebted to you for bringing them into the fold as well. Most sincerely, Peter A. McMahan http://fundraising.stjude.org/site/TR/Heroes/Heroes?px=3961606&pg=personal&fr_id=72852

Oct 11, 8:07 PM

Jeffboat launched the M/V Fort Defiance October 10th, A 2000 horsepower azimuth-drive towboat. It is 70 by 32 by 10 11 with two ZF Marine drive units, and powered by two 1000 HP Caterpillar engines. Electrical systems use a pair of John Deere 4045 TFM85 Tier 3 Generators, each generating 65kw. The M/V Fort Defiance has tankage for 22,200 gallons of fuel, 4,650 gallons of ballast, and 5,800 gallons of potable water. Mark Glaab, Facility Manager at the Cairo Fleet had this to say. Im tickled ****less to get this boat! This is the first new vessel weve ever had at this location, so we are delighted to welcome the M/V Fort Defiance to our fleet. Our captains are interested to see how the z-Drive technology performs for us. The boat gets its name, Fort Defiance, from the geography of the area near the ACBL Fleet in Cairo, IL. Fort Defiance Park sits at the point of confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, so its fitting that the boat is going to work to serve that specific area. Camp Defiance as it was known during the Civil War, was a strategic location where Ulysses S. Grant staged raids into Confederate strongholds in Missouri, Tennessee, and Kentucky, securing early victories for the Union. President Lincoln was so impressed, he decided to promote Grant to the rank of Major General of Volunteers.

Sep 28, 6:42 PM

Cairo Fleet recently went 556 days incident free. During this time, the Cairo team cleaned 1422 barges, repaired another 2014, and handled a whopping 22,309! This is a new record for incident free days for this team, and they fully intend to break another. Great job, everyone.