Atlantic Media

Atlantic Media

Atlantic Media is an American print and online media company owned by David G. Bradley and based in the Watergate in Washington, D.C. Wikipedia

Atlantic Media

Atlantic Media is an American print and online media company owned by David G. Bradley and based in the Watergate in Washington, D.C. Wikipedia

  • Oct 31 at 5:37 PM
    Fun is the feeling of finding something new in something familiar. Reaching a new accomplishment in a difficult task at work. Succeeding at an act on the pitch or in the gym that had previously resulted in failure. Doing the same thing already seen before, even, but with small variation. Fun-size candy bars are fun for this reason. Ian Bogost posits that ""Big Candy Bars Have No Place on Halloween,"" because they ruin the fun of the fun-size treat.: Katie Martin (@katiethevisual) / The Atlantic
  • Oct 30 at 6:26 PM
    On the eve of this years traditional All Hallows'' Eve, Alan Taylor put together a collection of spooky, scary, (and fun) photographs from recent haunted houses, zombie walks, Halloween parties, and more. Here, participants dressed up as Dobby the House Elf, from the Harry Potter book series, on the Halloween weekend in the Shibuya district of Tokyo, Japan. Visit theatlantic.com/photo for images from Chile, England, Japan, Sweden, Mexico, Ukraine, Bolivia, Singapore, and across the U.S. : Taro Karibe / Getty
  • Oct 30 at 11:04 AM
    Efforts to create Christian unity, or ecumenism, often carry a note of historical sadness. Prejudices borne of past violence are difficult to overcome. For more than a century following Martin Luther, Christian reformers and their political allies across Europe battled with the Catholic Church-aligned Holy Roman Empire. Catholics slaughtered Protestants; Protestants slaughtered Catholics; and both persecuted groups like the Anabaptists, who championed adult rather than infant baptism. Most traditions did not develop their distinctiveness by accident; many religious leaders staked their lives on their particular interpretation of the Bible. (I cannot and will not recant anything, since to act against ones conscience is neither safe nor right, Luther famously told the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V in the face of excommunication and death.) While relations among Christians are far more peaceful today than they were 500 years ago, Emma Green writes, the tension between theological particularity and yearning for universal fellowship is still just as complicated. And as global Christianity evolves, the tension is likely to increase. Read ""Why Cant Christians Get Along, 500 Years After the Reformation?"" online. : Max Rossi / Reuters / Katie Martin / The Atlantic
  • Oct 29 at 0:02 PM
    Joy, purification, renewal, deaththe sea is all of these things in Manhattan Beach, Jennifer Egans intricately patterned and visionary new novel. The author of four previous novels and a collection of short stories, Egan is the writer of the Pulitzer Prizewinning A Visit From the Goon Squad (2010), one of the most stirring and unusual works of fiction of the past decade. Fans of Egan who have been eagerly anticipating her next novel may not initially be sure what to make of Manhattan Beach, which is a historical novelperhaps todays least fashionable form, and a thorough surprise after Goon Squad, the last chapter of which takes place in Manhattan in what seems to be the mid-2020s, and features smartphone-using toddlers and a sinister method of viral marketing. But perhaps the turn to the past is not as large a leap as it appears, writes Ruth Franklin, in the November issue. Read more from Franklin in Jennifer Egans Surprising Swerve Into Historical Fiction, online and in the magazine. : Sally Deng (@sa.deng)

Oct 31, 5:37 PM

Fun is the feeling of finding something new in something familiar. Reaching a new accomplishment in a difficult task at work. Succeeding at an act on the pitch or in the gym that had previously resulted in failure. Doing the same thing already seen before, even, but with small variation. Fun-size candy bars are fun for this reason. Ian Bogost posits that ""Big Candy Bars Have No Place on Halloween,"" because they ruin the fun of the fun-size treat.: Katie Martin (@katiethevisual) / The Atlantic

Oct 30, 6:26 PM

On the eve of this years traditional All Hallows'' Eve, Alan Taylor put together a collection of spooky, scary, (and fun) photographs from recent haunted houses, zombie walks, Halloween parties, and more. Here, participants dressed up as Dobby the House Elf, from the Harry Potter book series, on the Halloween weekend in the Shibuya district of Tokyo, Japan. Visit theatlantic.com/photo for images from Chile, England, Japan, Sweden, Mexico, Ukraine, Bolivia, Singapore, and across the U.S. : Taro Karibe / Getty

Oct 30, 11:04 AM

Efforts to create Christian unity, or ecumenism, often carry a note of historical sadness. Prejudices borne of past violence are difficult to overcome. For more than a century following Martin Luther, Christian reformers and their political allies across Europe battled with the Catholic Church-aligned Holy Roman Empire. Catholics slaughtered Protestants; Protestants slaughtered Catholics; and both persecuted groups like the Anabaptists, who championed adult rather than infant baptism. Most traditions did not develop their distinctiveness by accident; many religious leaders staked their lives on their particular interpretation of the Bible. (I cannot and will not recant anything, since to act against ones conscience is neither safe nor right, Luther famously told the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V in the face of excommunication and death.) While relations among Christians are far more peaceful today than they were 500 years ago, Emma Green writes, the tension between theological particularity and yearning for universal fellowship is still just as complicated. And as global Christianity evolves, the tension is likely to increase. Read ""Why Cant Christians Get Along, 500 Years After the Reformation?"" online. : Max Rossi / Reuters / Katie Martin / The Atlantic

Oct 29, 0:02 PM

Joy, purification, renewal, deaththe sea is all of these things in Manhattan Beach, Jennifer Egans intricately patterned and visionary new novel. The author of four previous novels and a collection of short stories, Egan is the writer of the Pulitzer Prizewinning A Visit From the Goon Squad (2010), one of the most stirring and unusual works of fiction of the past decade. Fans of Egan who have been eagerly anticipating her next novel may not initially be sure what to make of Manhattan Beach, which is a historical novelperhaps todays least fashionable form, and a thorough surprise after Goon Squad, the last chapter of which takes place in Manhattan in what seems to be the mid-2020s, and features smartphone-using toddlers and a sinister method of viral marketing. But perhaps the turn to the past is not as large a leap as it appears, writes Ruth Franklin, in the November issue. Read more from Franklin in Jennifer Egans Surprising Swerve Into Historical Fiction, online and in the magazine. : Sally Deng (@sa.deng)

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