Yogis spend an average of $62,640 in a lifetime stretching and relaxing

The $62,640 is comprised of an estimated $28,800 spent on yoga classes, plus $33,840 on apparel, mats, and other accessories.

Eat, Pray, Pay: The average yoga practitioner spends $62,640 on yoga in a lifetime, according to new data. Yoga originated in the east as a meditative and spiritual practice, possibly back to the pre-Vedic Indian traditions. Today, it is practiced by mostly white women trying to relax and find themselves while also aspiring to crush it at work.
 
This lifelong number was part of the findings of a study conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Eventbrite that examined the yoga trends and habits of 2,000 Americans.

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The $62,640 is comprised of an estimated $28,800 spent on yoga classes, plus an additional $33,840 on apparel (Lululemon isn’t cheap!), mats, and other accessories.
 
Dedicated yogis will pay just under $90 for yoga in a month, or $1,044 over a year. The average yoga will spend $40 for a one-time yoga experience that’s “special,” while 8% will spend over $100 for a “memorable” experience. (Goat yoga, anyone?)

Namaste and spend more money

The reason? It’s easy: 87% of people who have tried yoga are in a better mood when it’s over.
Respondents practice yoga on average twice a week, but yogis who are into group classes do it even more often: 16% of them practice at least five times a week.
Classes are worth it, according to the numbers. Paying up to $40 for varying types of yoga classes has an impact: 56% of people who typically do yoga in group classes say they are “very happy” after a yoga class, compared to just 36% of people who practice by themselves.
Overall, the yoga business is booming, and classes are getting more experimental, with offerings in 2019 like aerial yoga, cat yoga (which you can practice at New York City’s cat cafe), beer yoga (which is really a thing), and naked yoga (also exists). No word yet on whether any of these practices will take off or if people will stick to more traditional classes.
 

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Sheila McClear|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at smcclear@theladders.com.