Workers in this industry take the longest to get ready for work in the morning

According to a new survey from Best Mattress Brand of over 1,000 people, those who worked for the government took the longest to get ready at 42 minutes.

Ladders recently learned that a significant number of people tend to sleep through their alarm clock but once they do get up, who takes the longest to get ready? According to a new survey from Best Mattress Brand of over 1,000 people, those who worked for the government took the longest to get ready at 42 minutes. They were followed by education employees (41 minutes), homemakers (40 minutes), and construction workers (38 minutes).

As for who took the least amount of time? Transportation and warehousing workers took the shortest amount of time at 33 minutes. Interestingly, unemployed people took longer than some people going to work.

Average number of minutes it takes people to get ready in the morning by industry

  1. Government and Public Administration (42 minutes)
  2. Education (41 minutes)
  3. Homemaker (40 minutes)
  4. Construction (38 minutes)
  5. Hotel, Food Services, and Hospitality (38 minutes)
  6. Medical and healthcare (37 minutes)
  7. Arts, Entertainment and Recreation (37 minutes)
  8. Wholesale and Retail (36 minutes)
  9. Finance and Insurance (35 minutes)
  10. Unemployed (35 minutes)
  11. Information Services and Data Processing (34 minutes)
  12. Manufacturing (34 minutes)
  13. Technology (33 minutes)
  14. Transportation and Warehousing (33 minutes)

By generation, Millennial women took the second longest at 40 minutes but Gen X ladies came in first with 42 minutes. Millennial men took the least amount of time at 31 minutes and Baby Boomer men took the most time at 39 minutes.

The survey found that people who were less happy with their jobs were more likely than those satisfied at work to lie in bed after the alarm sounded (11 minutes vs. nine minutes). The status of your relationship could also be a factor in your getting out of bed speed. Divorced respondents averaged nine minutes in bed after their alarms went off, while for married people it was only eight minutes.

Salary did not play a role in staying in bedtime interestingly.

Meredith Lepore|is the Deputy Editor of Ladders and can be reached at mlepore@theladders.com.