WeWork cuts off Manchester taps for abusing its free beer policy

WeWork provides free beer as a perk to its members… but… but members in Manchester and New York City are learning it’s a perk that can be taken away

Photo: Yutacar

A much-touted feature of coworking giant WeWork includes complimentary beer on tap. (Well, you or your company is technically paying for it in some way). WeWorkers in Manchester, England, were recently outraged to find their taps cut off, apparently because of overuse and general noisiness, The Outline reported.

The suds stopped flowing Monday through Wednesday, and workers gathered in an online forum that connects WeWorkers to hash it out.

“Judging by the conversations I’ve heard today about it, the resounding answer is there is about to be uproar … apparently (so I’m told) they will only be open 5-7pm Thurs/Fri,” on WeWorker posted, according to the Outline. The taps had previously opened every open day at 2 p.m.

“This is bang out of order!” posted another angry Brit.

Finally, an admin stepped into the forum.

“I cannot deny that there have been concerns raised regarding the drinking culture in our office and striking the balance between being a professional working environment and one that is relaxed is very difficult,” the admin posted on behalf of WeWork.

There was a similar struggle over beer in New York City that began last October, when WeWork amended its unlimited beer-on-tap policy to a not-so-paltry four drinks per person, per day. Members had to swipe their key cards to access the taps, and were cut off after four 12-ounce drinks. The taps did not work all hours of the day, as they did previously, and were restricted from 12 p.m. til 8 p.m. New York City WeWork’s change in drinking policy dovetailed with a sexual harassment lawsuit from a woman citing she was assaulted at two company events at WeWork.

The Outline, who makes their office home in an NYC WeWork themselves, noted that the taps are “flowly freely again,” and the long, hard experiment with beer privation seems to be over.

In the words of H.L. Mencken, “24 hours in a day. 24 beers in a case. Coincidence? I think not.”

Sheila McClear|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at smcclear@theladders.com.