This is why you should wear your glasses when you are at work

Of all the stereotypes that have do with accessories, there is perhaps no one more true than associating higher intelligence with people who wear glasses. I mean that’s pretty much the entire premise for the Revenge of the Nerds films. But according to a new study, that association actually has some merit to it.

Of all the stereotypes that have do with accessories, there is perhaps no one truer than associating higher intelligence with people who wear glasses. I mean that’s pretty much the entire premise for the Revenge of the Nerds films. But according to a new study, that association actually has some merit to it.

Researchers in Scotland looked at data for over 300,000 people in North America, Europe and Australia and found that people with higher levels of intelligence were more likely to be nearsighted or myopic than those with lower scores. Mind blown. The study also found negative correlations between higher cognitive function and heart problems, lung cancer, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis and depression.

Short-sightedness for the win

The study was published in the journal Nature Communications and it was also found that there was genetic overlap between intelligence and nearsightedness, but interestingly no overlap between intelligence and farsightedness or hyperopia but more research needs to be done to prove that correlation.


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Besides giving glasses wearers gloating rights, this study is also significant because it shows a biological connection between intelligence and other health factors. Dr Gail Davies, of University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology told The Telegraph, “The discovery of shared genetic effects on health outcomes and brain structure provides a foundation for exploring the mechanisms by which these differences influence thinking skills throughout a lifetime.”

So you may be a four eyes but you are probably smarter, healthier and happier than your non-glasses wearing coworker according to this study.

Meredith Lepore|is the Deputy Editor of Ladders and can be reached at mlepore@theladders.com.