Report: Employees who like their workspace are 16% more productive

Worker satisfaction and productivity is tied to how happy they are with their workspace, and the open office is morphing into the hot-desking “zoned” agile office.

“The space is the Capital One Labs – San Francisco Lab (5th floor) designed in partnership with IA – Interior Architects. Photo credit is Jasper Sanidad Photography.”

Where you work – literally – is everything.  According to a study by Gartner, a research and advisory company, employees who are satisfied with their physical workspace are 16% more productive and 18% more likely to stay with their current company. In fact, workers who like their workspace setup – whether it’s an ergonomic desk, the perfect amount of quiet, or the ability to go somewhere to concentrate when they need to – are 30% more attracted to their company over competitors.

It’s the agile office that is the office of the future, says Zach Capers, senior content analyst of GetApp. And that doesn’t exactly mean the open office – the agile office is “a flexible work environment composed of several distinct spaces that meet the needs of various work styles,” he says. Essentially, it’s a space broken up into zones for workers’ various needs throughout the day – be it places for quiet, places for collaboration, places to gather publicly, and so on.

“[It] strikes a balance between individual and collaborative spaces that allow employees to work in the manner they prefer,” says Capers. “This means individual workstations and collaborative desk clumps along with common areas and quiet zones.” And hot desking, the next inevitable trend.

Think of workspace design agility as the next logical step up from the open office – there’s still the same increased interaction, but the agile office “resolves its most glaring problems, such as distraction and a lack of privacy,” says Capers.

It’s the long-coming evolution of the dreaded chaos of open office life into something more regulated, a place that’s saner and more adaptive to more employee’s needs. And if your company builds a “huddle room” or a phone booth, you may not even have to take your phone calls outside anymore.

 

Sheila McClear|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at smcclear@theladders.com.