People in this industry spend the most money on work clothes

Certain industries require people to dress differently, but which industries have employees shelling out some major money on work attire?

Certain industries require people to dress differently, but which industries have employees shelling out some major money on work attire? You think it would be those who work in the actual fashion industry, right? After all, in The Devil Wears Prada Andy Sachs didn’t start succeeding at work until she upgraded her wardrobe from “oh no” to “au couture.”

But according to a survey of 2,000 Americans about fashion in the workplace from Trunk Club, people in the broadcast industry spend the most money on clothes with an average of $129.38 per month and then followed by accounting at $118.01 per month. To give you a little context the survey found that 60% of those asked only spend $50 or less on work attire per month.

Though you would think that people in broadcast, especially those on air, wouldn’t have their wardrobe provided to them but that is most likely only at the top news outlets. For people working in local broadcast news they are usually wearing their own clothes that they purchase. A few years ago Slate put out a piece on on-air female meterologists being obsessed with a dress from Amazon for the price point and the variety because so few of them had wardrobe budgets. “Sometimes what to wear is biggest stress of my job,” the Weather Channel’s Jen Carfagno said in the article. “Don’t look too old, or too young. Too tight will make you look like ready for the dance club. Too baggy will make you look frumpy. Black every day is boring. Patterns are tough with the lights and camera. Staying wrinkle-free is tough. How many styles of red dresses are there anyway?”

Dressing down

Accounting seems a bit surprising but perhaps it is because 50% of the people in this industry say they feel judged when they dress more casually. Other industries that feel judged for dressing down are hotel/hospitality workers (45%), finance (45%) and realtors (42%.)

The survey also found that most people don’t feel comfortable dressing down at a new job until they have been there for at least two months unless you work in telecommunications and then you start going casual a few days into the new gig.

Hopefully you are in the right industry if you like dressing casual!

Meredith Lepore|is the Deputy Editor of Ladders and can be reached at mlepore@theladders.com.