On being tenacious, staying patient, and talking face-to-face

On being tenacious, staying patient, and talking face-to-face: Be your own best advocate. Live for tomorrow. Meet in person in our digital age.

On being tenacious

What if you send an email to make introductions and the person never responds?

Do you say to yourself, “Oh well, I guess they didn’t want to talk with me”?

Time to switch your thinking.

Sometimes the person didn’t see your message or meant to answer but forgot. You must follow up a second time … and maybe even a third time by phone.

It’s not being pushy or too forward. It’s called looking out for your own career.

Remember: no one will fight harder for you than you’ll fight for yourself.

Be your own best advocate. Send that second email and see where it takes you.

On being patient

What if I told you that it would take at least a year (and probably more) before you see any tangible result from a passion project?

Would you still put in the work, month after month?

These days, we expect instant gratification. For one moment, we have exactly what we want. A second later, it’s gone. Forever.

How do we create permanence, longevity and, ultimately, a legacy? By putting in the effort for months and often years so we can create something that can last. Maybe even forever.

Live for tomorrow. In doing so, you will uncover your best self today.

On talking face-to-face

There’s no substitute for a face-to-face conversation.

Tools like Twitter and LinkedIn are great to help us network, but they should be a starting point rather than the place we hold the entire exchange.

If you can’t physically meet in person, ask for a Skype or Google Hangout video chat in lieu of a phone call. Once the other person can see you, it adds a new dimension to the relationship and will help you build trust.

Face to face in our digital age. Yes, it can — and should — be done.

This article was originally published on DannyRubin.com.

Danny Rubin|is an award-winning author and speaker on business communication skills