Half of Americans consider themselves workaholics

The group of people who feel like workaholics the most is Millennials 25-34 years old, at 55%, while 37% of respondents age 55+ felt the same.

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Nearly half (48%) of Americans consider themselves to be workaholics, according to new research.

It may also be that constant access to digital devices makes people feel like they’re working all the time – 78% of Americans display work-obsessed tendencies, such as looking at their phone as soon as they get up in the morning, with 58% of those checking their work email. Another 58% checked their work email from bed (72% of Millennials did the same).

The group of people who feel like workaholics the most is Millennials 25-34 years old, at 55%, while 37% of respondents age 55+ felt the same.

The study of 2,000 working Americans was conducted by OnePoll on behalf of The Vision Council.

Self-professed workaholics said they were that way out of a passion for their job (34%), financial necessity (27%), or for both reasons (35%).

Meanwhile, working Americans worried about work while they were on vacation, while they were not at work, and they also worried they prioritized their work over having a personal life. They spent an average of four hours working off the clock. They also didn’t make their lives easier by taking care of personal tasks at work, feeling that they either weren’t allowed to or were uncomfortable doing so.

Working Americans racked up an average of seven and a half hours of looking at screens – from laptops to desktops to smartphones – every day. 35% of Americans logged an impressive nine hours of screen time daily.

Millennials were the most stressed out about work, at 61%, followed by 52% of ages 35-44, 49% of ages 45-54, and a scant 39% of ages 55 and older.

While studies say healthy workaholics exist (if you love your work and are engaged), there are ways to curb workaholism if you want to. Start by taking breaks every hour (52 minutes of work to 17 minutes of break is one suggestion), avoid eating lunch at your desk, practice leaving work on time, and don’t let yourself get tethered to your phone and email in your off-hours. Also … take a vacation!

Sheila McClear|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at smcclear@theladders.com.