Doing this just 10 minutes a day could help you prevent disability later in life

The study began with more than 1,500 participants between the ages of 49 and 83 from the multi-site study on knee osteoarthritis.

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A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern Medicine published Monday in the American Journal For Preventive Medicine advances a theory that champions one hour a week of brisk to vigorous physical activity is linked to a significant risk decrease for disability later in life.

“Even though it’s well known physical activity can help prevent disability, for many people, they’re just inactive, and it’s daunting to get started,” Dorothy Dunlop, the lead author of the study, told USA Today.


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Just 10 minutes a day

The study began with more than 1,500 participants between the ages of 49 and 83 from the multi-site study on knee osteoarthritis, known as the Osteoarthritis Initiative. The individuals utilized in the study all experienced pain in their lower-extremity joints such as their hips, knees, and ankles.

The researchers required the participants to wear accelerators so that they could measure their physical activity. These individuals were then followed up over the course of four years. The results yielded a 86% risk decrease for those that committed to just 56 minutes of intense to mild exercise a week, which amounts to a little more than 10 minutes a day.

The study states, “Minimal thresholds of 56 and 55 moderate-vigorous minutes/week best predicted disability-free status over four years from mobility and activities of daily living disabilities, respectively, across the candidate measures. Thresholds were consistent across sex, BMI, age, and knee osteoarthritis presence.”

Now the more active you are the more subtotal the benefits, but Dunlop believes starting a 10 minutes a day of moderate exercise can help individuals with predictors for disability hold on to their faculties and independence for much longer than they would have otherwise.

For healthy adults that exhibit osteoarthritis symptoms or express pain in their lower extremity joints, the CDC recommends getting 150 minutes of moderate exercise a week.


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CW Headley|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at cheadley@theladders.com.