5 ways to handle an influx of new people at your company

Having one or two new employees start around the same time is one thing, but when a bunch of new hires come on board around the same time, companies can change overnight. Here’s how to welcome them and the changes they will bring.

Having one or two new employees start around the same time is one thing, but when a bunch of new hires come on board around the same time, companies can change overnight. Here’s how to welcome them and the changes they will bring.

Get to know them

Whether the new people sit near you or across the office, feel free to introduce yourself and tell them what team you’re part of when you meet them face-to-face for the first time.

Your company may or may not introduce new hires publicly, but doing this is sure to help them feel more at home at their new workplace.

You’ll also probably feel more clued into whats going on with new hires.

Try not to feel too left out

If a bunch of people join other teams, but not yours, you might feel like you’re not part of the office “tribe.”

But if they join your department, just realize that this is an opportunity to get to know people who might eventually become valuable additions to your professional network. You can probably learn a lot from at least one new employee on your team, if not more than one.

An influx of new employees could also be a good sign of growth and can make it easier to tell where the company is heading.

Accept that the office dynamic will change

Realize and accept this — as long as the new hires aren’t disruptive, that is.

New people will bring new energy into your workspace, which just might shake up the company culture in a good way. They may also bring in fresh perspectives and ideas.

But if all the new employees are making it harder for you to get work done, look for a quiet space to work or put in headphones while at your desk.

Be open to their questions

Whether they need someone to quickly show them the ropes, or they have questions about the kind of work you do, be receptive to their questions and concerns.

Chances are, you won’t have all the answers, so feel free to point them in the direction of someone who knows more when you’re stumped. This is also a good way for them to branch out and get to know others.

Introduce them to key people

New employees’ managers may not have gotten around to introducing them to other people in passing — especially if they aren’t in the same department.

Clearly, this is in the same vein as being open to new employees’ questions and concerns: if they have a question about something and you know the perfect coworker in another department who could be of help, introduce them to each other.

Who knows? Maybe one day they’ll return the favor by introducing you to someone you haven’t met before.

Jane Burnett|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at jburnett@theladders.com.