4 ways to have a hard reset at work

“It’s really difficult to change your mindset when your desk is littered with pens, folders, books, and the like.”

Whether you’re in a productivity rut or you’ve lost all passion for your job, having a hard reset can be beneficial at work. It gives you time to pause before diving headfirst into another huge project while doubting your reasons for being there in the first place.

Keeping all this in mind, here are four ways to make this happen by shaking things up.

Make “inbox zero” your mission

Research has found that 24% of Americans think getting to this point is an impossibility, but this is a major way to clear up your inbox clutter.

Do things like responding immediately, coming up with a plan for emails you can’t do this with, and being brutal when it comes to deleting messages.

I’ll also be the first to admit that personally, I have a lot inbox cleaning to do, but I can dream! I’m doing a lot worse than the average employee, whose inbox reportedly contains an average of 199 unread emails, according to separate research.

Clean up your crowded desk

It’s really difficult to change your mindset when your desk is littered with pens, folders, books, and the like. So act like you’re doing some spring cleaning and make some big changes to your workspace that will help you focus.

Buy a plant, an oil diffuser for a pleasant scent, and give yourself permission to throw out whatever you don’t need.

Have a one-on-one meeting with your manager

During this meeting, you can talk about long-term and short-term projects you’re working on, and also use this as an opportunity to get feedback about your overall performance. You can also use this time with your boss to talk about any concerns that have been nagging you, and maybe even start some preliminary planning for your future at the company.

Just be sure to prepare first so that you walk in all caught up like you would if it was a performance review.

Re-assess your career goals

Write them down in a notebook or type them out on a document — whatever works best for you.

Taking the time to write down goals you’ve set over the years gives you the chance to actively edit them, and put your new notes in an important spot that you can refer back to. You learn something new every day at work, so your perspective on what you want for your career is bound to change over time.

Jane Burnett|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at jburnett@theladders.com.