4 things you should never utter when your manager is in earshot

Some things should really be common sense, but it always pays to have a refresher: there are a bunch of things you should never, ever say when your boss is around. Here are four of those things.

Photo: Kristina Flour

Some things should really be common sense, but it always pays to have a refresher: There are a bunch of things you should never, ever say when your boss is around. Here are four of those things.

That someone else should do something instead of you

This isn’t a good idea.

Matt Rosoff, CNBC’s Editorial Director of Digital, with years of team management experience, writes on the site about how he doesn’t like hearing employees say that “somebody should … ”

He writes about how people usually say this in an effort to be “helpful,” but this isn’t the case.

“They think they’re saying, ‘I’m a strategic and creative thinker who looks beyond the limits of my defined role and thinks of ways to improve the fortunes of the business overall. Please consider my larger value to the company when you think about my performance,’ ” he writes. “But that’s not what their boss hears. Their boss hears, ‘I’d like to add another task to your to-do list.’ ”

That you just had a wild night on the town

Keep this outside of work.

Debby Mayne, an author and etiquette writer, writes on The Spruce about why you should never do this.

“Never never never go into detail when talking about the wild and crazy weekend you had. On Monday morning walk into the office with a smile, and if the person in the next cubicle asks how your weekend was, say something benign like, “I had a great one. How about you?” Turning the attention to the person asking will let you off the hook,” she writes.

A long slew of curse words

Colorful language isn’t a big deal in every workspace, and everyone has rough days at work, but you should always try to keep it professional when your boss is around.

So don’t stand out for always being in a bad mood and using filthy language to show how you feel. Your colleagues probably won’t want to work with you anymore.

It’s definitely wise to find other ways to express yourself.

That you’re not having that much fun at work right now

Daniel Bortz, a freelance writer and Keller Williams Real Estate Salesperson, writes on Monster that you should never say “I’m bored” at work.

He features advice from Nicole Wood, CEO and co-founder of career coaching firm Ama La Vida.

“Find yourself just sitting at your desk daydreaming? If so, it’s your responsibility to look for ways to fill your spare time. ‘If you just say, ‘I’m bored,’ you’re dumping the problem on your boss’ shoulders,’ Wood says.

Your best tactic is to find out if your manager has any tasks that could be passed on to you. Offer to look at your department’s procedures and see where you can introduce efficiencies.”

Jane Burnett|is a reporter for Ladders and can be reached at jburnett@theladders.com.