Career Advice

From Marc Cenedella
Marc Cenedella

When two candidates are equally experienced, equally credentialed, and equally capable, who gets the job?

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Lying

Truth, Lies and Resumes

Companies are screening more closely than ever before. Getting caught in a lie could raise enough questions about your character to cost you the job.

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Resume Trick or Treat

Here's how recruiters and hiring managers sniff out resume facts from fiction.

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Negotiate a Bigger Salary with Your Resume

The right resume can boost a salary offer if it boasts a killer summary statement, doesn't undersell or exaggerate, and its proprietor nails the interview.

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To Tell the Truth: Resume Rules
Recruiters and resume experts draw a firm line between putting your best foot forward and lying on your resume.
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Breaking Resume Rules
Recruiters and hiring professionals share some of the whoppers and doozies job seekers have tried to sneak into resumes over the years.
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Truth in Advertising
Thoughts and notes from TheLadders’ editor-in-chief on how to tell the truth and sell your personal brand in a resume.
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Most Common Resume Lies
Reference checks reveal 8 percent of accomplishments listed in resume job descriptions to be, at best, exaggerations, and 18 percent of resumes include fake companies, according to Accu-Screen.
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Lying on Your Resume: How Far to Stretch the Truth

The risk is high for jobs seekers who try to slip fake master's degrees, phony salaries and exaggerated titles into their resume and job interview.

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Lying on Your Resume

Amid fierce competition for every single job, where do you draw the line between embellishing and lying on your resume?

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Ethics and Resume Writing

Your resume should position you in the best possible light. But watch how far you go to accomplish this.  Note the following suggestions for creating a more authentic presentation of your qualifications.

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