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From Marc Cenedella
Marc Cenedella

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Personal Branding

Know Your Audience

Before you say it or write it, think about the listener and reader. How do they want to hear it and read it?

By Richard Atkins
FILED UNDER: Presentation, Cover Letters.
Personal Branding

The starting point for all communication is becoming aware of the intended audience and approaching them on an appropriate level. So many times, people get themselves into difficult situations because they did not consider the audience’s reaction to the message. Anyone could make a list of controversies that started as the result of an insensitive remark or one that was not well thought out. In addition to considering what the message says, as a writer (and speaker) you need to consider how the ideas are expressed.

To ensure successful written communication, first think about the people who will read it. By putting yourself in their shoes, you will gain insight into what they want to know and how they want to be addressed. The Temple of Apollo at Delphi in Greece has an inscription that cautions each person to “know yourself.” Improving communications encourages people to know thy audience.

Salespeople are no strangers to the concept of “put yourself in the buyer’s position.” It means that the seller (in this case, you as writer) will consider what features and benefits to present to the person on the receiving end. Word choice and message length (think: brevity) will show your recipient how much thought and care you put into crafting your message.

Audiences are composed of people, all of whom have different perceptions. These questions will yield a variety of answers, simply because perceptions differ:

  • What is a lot of money?
  • What is tall?
  • What is hot?

It’s a fun exercise to ask these questions in a diverse group. Notice how responses differ, based on people’s life experiences, income levels, educational backgrounds — anyone could increase this list. In fact, try asking a group to define the word “hit.” You’ll get answers that range from “a Top 40 single” to “another card at the blackjack table” and many others. The point is that by showing the audience that you thought about these factors before approaching them, you’re demonstrating that you care about them. What could be a better compliment?

To avoid having messages misperceived, misconstrued or misunderstood, choose language that will be understood by most (preferably all) of your recipients. Think of the individuals who comprise your audience before you communicate with them. Ask yourself:

  • Who is the audience?
  • Why am I writing/presenting? What do I want my audience to know or do?
  • What do they already know? What is their level of understanding?
  • What is their likely attitude about the topic?
  • How can I honor my audience’s needs and perspectives?
  • What does my audience want to achieve?
  • What medium will support the message the best — e-mail, letter, memo, report, proposal, etc.?
  • What format or layout will appeal to the audience and support the message?

Then, as the final step before beginning to write, organize your ideas. It’s a true sign of respect for your audience. Show that you are concerned for their time and attention. Plan to present the information that will make the most sense to them. Your organizational pattern may take any form (chronological, inside to outside, top to bottom, etc.). However you deliver the information, just make sure that someone new to your subject area will “get it” without having to strain the brain to do so. With all this in place, you’re ready to put fingers to keyboard, or (how dated to say…) pen to paper. Approach the task with a positive attitude, a clear purpose and straightforward organization, and you’ll be on the path to achieving your goal.

Dr. Richard J. Atkins is the founder of Improving Communications, a New York-based corporate training firm, providing classes for individuals and businesses in Business Writing, Public Speaking, Customer Service, and Leadership Development. For more information, e-mail Dr. Atkins at rich.atkins@improvingcommunications.com or call 516.317.2900.

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